Category Archives: First Nations Oppose Trophy Killing of grizzlies

Bryce Casavant Replies to BC Wildlife Federation’s Alan Martin

http://vancouversun.com/opinion/op-ed/opinion-finding-our-bearings-a-gentle-yet-grizzly-rebuttal

I recognize that this is a difficult time for trophy hunters in B.C. Change is never easy. However, this does not mean we invent alternative facts to support rhetoric. In his opinion piece published in The Vancouver Sun on Dec. 27, Alan Martin has made multiple factually incorrect assertions to support the continuance of grizzly bear hunting. In an effort to correct misinformation, I would like to point out the following:

First, a B.C.-based independent polling company (Insights West) conducted a public survey in 2015 which found that 91 per cent of British Columbians opposed the trophy hunting of grizzly bears.

Second, following the 2017 provincial election, the new government conducted a public consultation process between September and October. The purpose was to solicit comments from all British Columbians regarding the management of grizzly bears. Over 4,000 responses were recorded. Of these responses received by government, over 78 per cent opposed the continued hunting of grizzly bears.

Therefore, a factually correct presentation would be to state: “A public survey found that 91 per cent of British Columbians oppose the trophy hunting of grizzly bears. Additionally, following a public consultation process, some 4,000 comments were received by the government of B.C., of which over 78 per cent opposed the hunting of grizzly bears.”

From these two points, a general argument is made that the hunting of grizzly bears is no longer socially acceptable by broader B.C. society.

Third, the B.C. Auditor-General never stated that hunting was not a threat to grizzly bear sustainability. Although the AG recognized that habitat loss was the most critical factor affecting grizzly bear populations, in no way is that meant to infer that hunting grizzly bears is a sustainable practice. To infer such a contention is to gravely misrepresent the findings of the review. Overall, the Auditor-General found that serious improvements to grizzly bear management were required.

Martin cites a dictionary to define the term “populist” and argues that the new NDP government is simply siding with the flavour of the day in order to gain votes and political support. Respectfully, I disagree. What I would suggest instead is that we are witnessing a change in societal values. I further argue that this change has led the new government to consider social values, scientific arguments, and the recommendations made by the B.C. Auditor-General — that the most appropriate dictionary word to describe the recent policy decision is not “populist” but rather “responsible” and most certainly “rational”.

Environmental management should be governed by the values of our society. And to be sure, these values will change over time. While we use science, experience, history and knowledge to inform government policy direction, ultimately, it is the values of the society we live in that progress over time and changes the manner in which we are governed. Call it democracy.

Having said all this, I must admit, I agree with Martin on one point: Inclusive of urban expansion, habitat loss, rail and highway mortalities, dwindling salmon stocks, and conflicts with humans, the plight of B.C.’s grizzly bears is far from restricted to the actions of hunting alone. However, where we differ is that I see hunting as a cumulative effect to a species that is already under immense pressure to find a new home and food. We can control the cumulative effect of hunting with the simple action of not pulling the trigger — if we do shoot, use a camera and kill only time. Our trophies should be memories and pictures. The only thing left behind in the bush should be our footprints in the sand, not a bloody, skinless and headless carcass.

Bryce Casavant is a former B.C. Conservation Officer who made international headlines in 2015 when he refused to kill two bear cubs. He is currently a doctoral candidate at Royal Roads University, studying public trust and wildlife co-existence in B.C.

link to Letter in Vancouver Sun by Alan Martin of the B.C. Wildlife Federation

Opinion: Populism and grizzly bears

Auditor General’s Report Reveals Grizzly Bear Management Under FLNR Has Failed, by VWS Society

October 30, 2017 TMTVNews.com

by VWS.org

http://bctvkootenays.com/2017/10/30/auditor-generals-report-reveals-grizzly-bear-management-under-the-ministry-of-forests-has-failed/

Recently BC’s Auditor General (AG) reported a plethora of problems in the management of BC’s grizzly bears.
(Submitted by the Valhalla Wilderness Society) The report says the problems were caused by a shift of wildlife management responsibilities from the Ministry of Environment (MOE) to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources (FLNRO) that occurred in 2011. According to the Auditor General’s report, “MFLNRO has most of the authority to make decisions that impact grizzly bear populations and habitat, leaving MOE with limited powers to carry out its mandate to manage and protect.”

“This was a gross betrayal of grizzly bears and all BC wildlife”, says VWS biologist Wayne McCrory, a former member of the past government Grizzly Bear Scientific Advisory Committee. “It is an apparent conflict of interest for FLNRO, which destroys habitat for grizzly bears by maintaining high rates of logging, pushing logging roads into wilderness areas, and degrading fish streams.”
Long before this transfer of power in 2011, the Ministry of Environment began to be stripped of much of its staff and funding. The findings of the Auditor General include a 1995 Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy that has never had a management plan attached to it, and thus, has no definitive procedures for implementation. A strategy for conducting population inventories and monitoring is touted on the internet, but is not used and has no funding.

FLNRO determines the number of grizzly bears that can be killed by hunters each year, yet the audit found a number of problems with the way this is calculated. The auditors at least expected that MFLNRO would be monitoring and evaluating forest development plans for their impacts on grizzly bears, but it wasn’t doing that either. Grizzly bears tend to disappear from roaded areas due to hunter access and increased human conflicts, as well as poaching. There are 600,000 kilometres of resource roads in the province, expanding by approximately 10,000 km a year, often without the necessary grizzly bear population figures or habitat inventory.
The 2017 audit notes that BC has failed to implement some recommendations of a 2010 audit on biodiversity. The 2010 report stated: “it was apparent that the conservation of biodiversity will become more at risk in the future due to the inadequate connectivity of parks and protected areas.” According to the recent report: “there has been little effort to address the issue of connectivity for grizzly bears….”

“The worst impact on wildlife was the past government’s almost 20-year failure to create large, fully protected, permanent parks, other than in the Great Bear Rainforest,” says Craig Pettitt, a director of VWS. “In the interior, the Valhalla Wilderness Society’s Selkirk Mountain Caribou Park Proposal would protect connectivity corridors between three existing parks. It contains prime grizzly bear habitat, grizzly bear viewing businesses and 29 severely endangered mountain caribou; it has had the benefit of numerous scientific studies, and has minimal resource conflicts.
Reversing the damage done by years of mismanagement of wildlife will require the new government to restore full responsibility for the Ministry of Environment Act and the Wildlife Act to the Ministry of Environment, with sufficient resources to do the job well. Secondly, BC urgently needs a dramatic increase in the percentage of fully protected areas.

Grizzly Meat Poisoning Alert in Russia, 34 people contaminated, 16 from Trichinosis

http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/major-brown-bear-meat-poisoning-alert-in-tomsk-region-as-34-contaminated-and-16-suffer-from-trichinosis/

GrizzlyMeatPhotoSmoked bear meat. Picture: mokvo4.ru

By The Siberian Times reporter
25 October 2017
Four children among those hit by the infection which has spread from a beast slaughtered this year

Trichinosis has been confirmed in inhabitants of Kataiga village in Tomsk region.
One of them now in the hospital at Siberian State Medical University in Tomsk.
Among the infected are residents of Tomsk and Barnaul.
Trichinosis is infection caused by the roundworm Trichinella spiralis or Trichinella roundworm.

Symptoms include diarrhoea, abdominal cramps, muscle pain, and fever.
People acquire the infection by eating raw or undercooked contaminated meat.
In total, watchdog Rospotrebnadzor detected 34 people, including four children, one only two, who consumed contaminated brown bear meat.

A dozen live in the village and the rest in Tomsk and Barnaul.
The head of Verkheketsk district, Alexey Sidikhin, said: ‘The bear was killed in the summer, if not in the spring.
‘The hunters were from Novosibirsk, their exact number is unknown to us – they immediately left.
‘One of the residents of Kataiga also took part in the hunt, apparently as a guide. He is now in the hospital.

Village chief Ivan Nasonov said: ‘We have seized 57 kilograms of bear meat.’ Picture: The Siberian TimesSeizedBearMeat

The total number of people confirmed as having contracted trichinosis is 16.

‘We are now looking for the hunters on our own. They also need to be warned that there is a risk of serious illness.’
Some meat was smoked, some salted. The hunters gifted the meat to villagers.
Village chief Ivan Nasonov said: ‘We have seized 57 kilograms of bear meat.
‘Some was sent analysis, some was destroyed.’
Trichinosis is a parasitic disease caused by roundworms of the Trichinella type.
During initial infection, invasion of the intestines can result in diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and vomiting.

DeadGrizzly The number of brown bears has recently increased this year. Picture: Zeya Reserve

Migration of larvae to muscle, which occurs after a week after being infected, can cause swelling of the face, fever, muscle pains, and a rash. Minor infection may be without symptoms.
Complications may include inflammation of the heart muscle, an attack on the central nervous system involvement, and inflammation of the lungs.
Trichinosis can be fatal depending on the severity of the infection.
Death can occur four to six weeks after infection, usually caused by myocarditis, encephalitis, or pneumonia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letter to Govt w Photo of Large Grizzly Bear Trophy Killed Oct’17

Members of the public may send comments to the Fish and Wildlife Branch at grizzly.bear@gov.bc.ca until November 2, 2017 –
The letter below is a sample of letters that have been emailed to Fish and Wildlife Branch….

Possibly the 2nd Largest grizzly bear hunted in Northern B.C. in Oct'16- killed by a trophy hunter from the U.S. on a guided hunt

Possibly the 2nd Largest grizzly bear ever hunted B.C. in Oct’17- killed by a trophy hunter from the U.S. on a guided hunt. A meat hunt will only make hunters go underground or take more selfies and give away the so called meat -note by Bears Matter

Quote taken from hunter’s Facebook page before it was closed to the public on Oct 23’17             “Big Teddy is hanging out at my buddy’s place in Vancouver BC while I wait for all the permits to cross the border.” – US Trophy Hunter

Oct 23, 2017

Dear Fish and Wildlife Branch at grizzly.bear@gov.bc.ca

Re: Possible loopholes in the plan to regulate the grizzly hunt in our province

I just read a post about a grizzly bear that was killed recently. It was a record-sized grizzly bear which apparently is the second largest grizzly ever shot in BC.

I believe that an unconditional ban must be put on this deplorable hunt. It is not acceptable, on any level, to snuff out the life of a living, breathing creature, for fun and for profit.

All loopholes that may allow trophy (and they are all trophy!) hunts must be closed. I hope and pray that I never again have to view a picture like the one I saw this morning – a hunter smiling over his kill of the “second largest grizzly ever shot in BC”. This was a beautiful creature that did not deserve to die. The “hunter” was just one of many heartless, thrill seeking individuals –maniacal psychopaths really; who kills for fun other than psychopaths? – who use our beautiful wilderness for their fun-seeking, destructive and selfish pleasure. We must not allow it. British Columbia is better than this – our government must protect all life in this province.

I voted for this government on their promise to “end the grizzly hunt” – to end it! I even told our MP, Ralph Sultan, that I was voting NDP because the Liberals would not end the hunt. However, from what I have read, I fear that the hunt “will not end unless the NDP Government closes loopholes in their plan to regulate the grizzly hunt in our province.”

Please ensure that there are no “loopholes” – and that grizzly bear hunting will be banned completely – not just “regulated”. I trust that the government will fulfill its promise and that my vote was not wasted.

Thank you for requesting our input.

PS: with regard to “Bear Meat”– On The Mayo Clinic Website under
Diseases and Conditions -Trichinosis – https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/trichinosis/basics/causes/CON-20027095
It states that “Wild animals, including bear, continue to be sources of infection.”
Never believe it when these creeps lie that “bear meat” is for consumption – it’s not!

Pacific Wild Blog: Poll British Columbians Support Ban on All Grizzly Bear Hunting

Click Here to Read Full Blog on Pacific Wild’s Site

IanMcAllisterGrizzlyCub  Oct 3, 2017Pacific Wild
Vancouver, BC – Three-in-four British Columbians believe no grizzly bears should be hunted in the province, a new poll by Insights West conducted in partnership with Lush Cosmetics and the Commercial Bear Viewing Association has found.
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 74% of British Columbians are in favour of banning all grizzly bear hunting in the province, while 19% are opposed.
The highest level of support for banning all hunting of grizzly bears in British Columbia is observed among women (78%), residents aged 35-to-54 (79%), Vancouver Islanders (81%), BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and BC Green Party voters in the 2017 provincial election (81% for each) and non-hunters (75%).
In addition, almost three-in-five self-described hunters (58%) are in favour of banning all grizzly bear hunting in British Columbia.

PollBanMeatHuntOct'17

The Government of British Columbia recently banned trophy hunting of grizzly bears in the province. This decision is backed by almost nine-in-ten British Columbians (88%), including 69% who “strongly” support it.
The survey was conducted at the end of August, two weeks after the government’s announcement. The decision allows a residential hunt to continue.
“Our polling has shown that British Columbians have consistently been opposed to trophy hunting, so the level of support for the government’s decision is not surprising,” says Mario Canseco, Vice President, Public Affairs, at Insights West. “Still, with so many residents who believe grizzlies should not be hunted at all, there is definitely appetite for more action.”
“With such strong results from British Columbians, we believe that the government can go further and ban all hunting of grizzly bears across the province,” says Tricia Stevens, Charitable Giving Manager at Lush Cosmetics. “Scientists, bear viewing operators, conservationists and now even hunters are agreeing it’s time to protect this iconic species for once and for all.”

Continue reading

Bears Matter Invites YOU to SeaLegacy’s Campaign to Stop Grizzly Killing in B.C.!

The half-hearted grizzly hunting moratorium in B.C. is not enough. We need to end hunting of all grizzly bears, forever

NicklenGrizzlies

At SeaLegacy, we are not going to be sidetracked by the B.C. government’s half-hearted decision to put a 2018 moratorium on the grizzly bear hunt, and we will continue to rally support until the government takes the killing of these majestic bears seriously.
In a months’s time, from the close of 2017’s hunting season on November 30th, the government of British Columbia is claiming to have banned all hunting of grizzlies within the Great Bear Rainforest of the mid central coast. While we recognise this step in the right direction, they have left a gaping and unnecessary loophole that is bound to be exploited: grizzly bears can still be hunted for meat.

This move is a glaring attempt to stay true to their campaign promise while still allowing trophy hunters to kill apex predators in B.C.’s territory. The government claims there are approximately 15,000 grizzlies in B.C. and hunters kill about 250 every year.
Natural Resources Minister Doug Donaldson has stated, “Hunters will no longer be able to possess the hide or the head or the paws of the bear, so we feel quite confident that this announcement will mean the end of the grizzly bear trophy hunt through the province.”
At SeaLegacy we know these immense, solitary creatures are more fragile than most people believe, requiring 4,000 square kilometres each as territory.
They are an umbrella species whose health can help determine the health of an entire ecosystem. To hunt them is anything but noble, and we want to add our voice to the loud chorus of British Columbians and citizens of the world who understand their value beyond a hide on a wall or a meal on a plate. After a recent week of filming brown bears in Alaska, SeaLegacy co-founder Paul Nicklen recalled his time working with these great brown bears.

Read More, See Stunning Photos and Take Action by going to https://act.sealegacy.org/s/stop-the-trophy-hunt