Category Archives: Fundraiser

Posts that are specifically for fundraising activities by Bears Matter

Action Alert: Save BC Wolves from Aerial Killing:Pacific Wild Petitioning B.C. Liberals Premier Christy Clark

BC Government Is getting Ready to Slaughter 180 Wolves over next two months

BC Government Is getting Ready to Slaughter 180 Wolves over next two months

This petition will be delivered to:

B.C. Liberals:Premier Christy Clark,Minister of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource,Hon. Steve Thomson,B.C. Minister of the Environment,Hon. Mary Polak, Green Party Leader,Elizabeth May

Assistant Deputy Minister – Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations,Tom Ethier Conservation Director, Pacific Wild,Ian McAllister

Save B.C. Wolves!

Pacific Wild Denny Island, B.C., Canada

January 15, 2015

B.C. Government green-lights controversial wolf hunt in the South Selkirk and South Peace regions. As many as 184 wolves to be shot from helicopters.

Decades of habitat destruction and human encroachment have left BC’s mountain caribou on the edge of survival. Instead of protecting critical food and habitat for caribou, such as the lichen rich interior forests, the BC government has now placed the blame on wolves. Over 180 wolves are now being targeted for aerial killing in the next two months. These highly social and intelligent animals, icons of our natural heritage, should not be killed because of government negligence. Killing all the wolves in BC won’t bring the caribou back in the absence of habitat protection.

Wolves are highly social and intelligent animals and research shows that predator kill programs increase reproductive rates in wolves and destabilizes pack structure causing more predation of livestock and other non-native prey.

It is the view of Pacific Wild that this announcement is scientifically unsound and that wolves are being used as a scapegoat to divert attention from the fundamental problem of ongoing habitat destruction and displacement caused by human encroachment.

“This is not management, it’s a tax-payer funded kill program of one of our most iconic species.” said Ian McAllister, Conservation Director for Pacific Wild.  “This is not only a horrific day for wolves in British Columbia but a sad day for public engagement and policy that will surely bring international condemnation to our borders.”

*(PLEASE NOTE you are NOT donating to Pacific Wild when asked  after you have signed the petition – you are donating to change.org) 

Please consider DONATING to Pacific Wild’s Save BC Wolves Indiegogo campaign here.
Learn more and support the campaign to end the wolf kill and educate the public about this issue.

Go to: www.pacificwild.org to learn more and take action

Share through social media: @pacificwild #saveBCwolves

Connect with us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter

Contact Pacific Wild: info@pacificwild.org

Pacific Wild is a B.C. based non-profit wildlife conservation organization and a leading advocate for changes to wolf management in British Columbia.   www.pacificwild.org

LETTER TO

B.C. Liberals Premier Christy Clark

Minister of Forest, Lands and Natural Resources Hon. Steve Thomson

B.C. Minister of the Environment Hon. Mary Polak

and 3 others

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May

Assistant Deputy Minister – Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Tom Ethier

Conservation Director, Pacific Wild Ian McAllister

Save B.C. Wolves!

Honourable Minister Steve Thomson 
Honourable Minister Mary Polak
Assistant Deputy Minister Tom Ethier

Read more 

RECENT UPDATES

PETITION UPDATE

Save BC Wolves Campaign

Jan 23, 2015 — British Columbia Wolf Kill Update

Thank you for signing the petition supporting an end to the wolf kill in B.C. We have reached 80,000 names in just a few short days – a truly… Read more

CLICK HERE to support Save B.C. Wolves

Stop the wolf kill, stand up for B.C. wolves. | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!

HTTP://WWW.INDIEGOGO.COM

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Ian McAllister of Pacific Wild has Audiences Spellbound during Great Bear Wild’14 Book Tour & Talk!

A new book called Great Bear Wild is about a photographer’s exploration of one of Earth’s last great hideaways                                                         (Ian McAllister of www.pacificwild.org)

Times Colonist Article on Nov 9, 2014 http://www.timescolonist.com/news

When photographer and author Ian McAllister left Victoria for the Great Bear Rainforest, he sailed to a place governments hadn’t even bothered to name.

IAN MCALLISTER, FROM GREAT BEAR WILD: DISPATCHES FROM A NORTHERN RAINFOREST, PUBLISHED BY GREYSTONE BOOKSA mother black bear teaches two of her cubs, one of them a Kermode bear, to fish in a Great Bear Rainforest river.It was 25 years ago and McAllister said back then government and

the timber industry wouldn’t even entertain questions about the area except to deny its existence: “There is no such thing as ‘the Great Bear Rainforest.’ ”

Moreover, then-premier Glen Clark called conservationists like McAllister “enemies of B.C.” for taking on the forest industry. Pundits huffed at the presumption of anyone who would dare “unilaterally christen a huge chunk of the mid-Coast.”

McAllister is unrepentant: “We came up with the name because when we first went up there it was just known as ‘The Mid-Coast Timber Supply Area.’ ”

“Now, there is a physical, ecological rationale for the name [the Great Bear Rainforest],” he said in a telephone interview last week. “And I don’t apologize for that.” McAllister has completed several books on the area and its wildlife, The Last Wild

Wolves and The Great Bear Rainforest and his most recent, Great Bear Wild. He is on a speaking tour with his newest book and will be in Victoria on Wednesday.

While home to grizzly and black bears, the Great Bear Rainforest is notable for being home to the cream-coloured, near-white Kermode bear, or Spirit Bear, as First Nations people call them. These animals are the result of a genetic quirk of black bears living there and nowhere else. The Great Bear Rainforest is about 6.4 million hectares of coastal forests stretching from Discovery Passage in the south to the B.C.-Alaska border. It also includes the offshore islands and islets, excepting Haida Gwaii and Vancouver Island.

When McAllister left Victoria on a sailboat to find and photograph what was then the near-mythic bear, he was accompanied by a few friends, including a special one named Karen. It was supposed to be a week-long trip. He and Karen never left.

Now, more than 20 years, three sailboats and two children later, Ian and Karen remain together. They make their home, along with children Callum, 11, and eight-year-old Lucy, on a tiny islet, total population 70 people, near Bella Bella.

The two kids are mostly home-schooled but attend a one-room schoolhouse with about 10 other children.

Ian has spent the decades exploring, diving, documenting and photographing the area, which he has come to see as more than just forest. For him, the area will always be a marriage of ocean and landscape.

Wolves in the area, for example, forage for food along the coast. They prey on seal pups. They swim from islet to islet looking for beached whale carcasses. They even eat herring roe.

“It’s a relationship of a terrestrial animal [wolves] with the marine environment,” McAllister said. “This is a very old relationship and it’s been little studied and is little understood.”

Even the Kermode bear comes with a theory of modern science illustrating the link between ocean and forest.

One modern biological explanation for the persistence of the genetic variant suggests the bear’s light colour makes it less visible when viewed against the sky by a salmon looking up from a stream. So the light colour provides a fishing advantage.

And this theory also introduces the salmon to the Great Bear Rainforest. The fish is what McAllister calls the area’s “foundation species,” spawning in the tens of thousands of streams found in the area.

“Salmon as a species are so powerful and have so much influence on the land, that they can actually change the colour of a terrestrial bear,” McAllister said.

The salmon is also an animal of both forest streams and open oceans. It’s life lends resonance to McAllister’s own impression of the area, one in which land and sea come together to make something unique.

“It just constantly brings us back to the influence of the ocean over the rainforest and vice versa, how the rainforest is in many ways nourishing the ocean environment,” he said.

Since McAllister’s first foray, the area has become known worldwide. It has been examined, discussed and recognized as a place worthy of recognition and conservation. It has also earned its name. Governments, the public and industry now call it “the Great Bear Rainforest” in the same way they might mention other natural marvels like the Great Barrier Reef or the Serengeti.

In 2006, after years of discussions, the B.C. government, 27 First Nations, wilderness campaigners (like McAllister) and industry agreed to a comprehensive proposal for the area in which most of it will be protected.

And McAllister said in the time he has been there he has noticed an increase in marine wildlife. For example, fin whales, an animal he first encountered rarely, are now common visitors to that section of the coast. Visits by humpback whales are up more than 10 times.

Meanwhile, the push to export oil and gas from B.C. is also envisioning an enormous increase in tanker traffic and coastal development to the coast. “The B.C. coast, unlike some other coastlines on the planet, is seeing a return of species that have been gone for some years,” McAllister said.

“But none of this [wildlife rebound] is brought into the debate about whether we should be building pipelines or introducing supertankers to the…. www.timescolonist.com  

Groups Seek Legal Remedies to Stop Government Decision to Re-introduce the Ontario Spring Bear Hunt

 

AnimalAllianceof Canada

Media Release

Groups seek legal remedies to stop government decision to re-introduce the Ontario Spring Bear Hunt. Organizations say – if the spring bear hunt is not stopped by the Wynne government before May 1, tiny bear cubs will be orphaned and die from starvation

Toronto, April 17, 2014: Animal Alliance of Canada and Zoocheck Canada are seeking legal remedies to stop the Ontario spring bear hunt and prevent tiny orphaned bear cubs from brutal death by starvation. On April 14, 2014 the Minister of Natural Resources and Attorney General of Ontario were served with a Notice of Application for Judicial Review and Notice of Constitutional Question on behalf of the two organizations. David Estrin, a certified environmental law specialist with Gowlings LLP in Toronto, Michael Watson, a Gowlings civil litigation partner and Brent Arnold, another Gowlings litigator, are the lawyers for the applicants. Three Justices of the Ontario Divisional Court are scheduled to hear the application April 29, 2014 in Toronto.

Mr. Estrin said that affidavits are being prepared to provide expert evidence about bear cub orphaning and death associated with spring bear hunting, as well as evidence from northern residents and former government staff who experienced previous bear hunts. He summarized the legal position to be advanced:“The Applicants contend that the Minister failed to comply with the MNR’s own Statement of Environmental Values and therefore failed to comply with section 11 of the Environmental Bill of Rights , that the Proposal violates the Criminal Code of Canada prohibition on causing cruelty to animals and is therefore illegal and unconstitutional, and the Minister did not apply for or receive approval for this Proposal under the Environmental Assessment Act.” “The spring bear hunt is cruel,” said Julie Woodyer, Campaign Director for Zoocheck Canada. “Bears come out of hibernation and are extremely hungry because they have not eaten all winter. They are attracted to garbage food (fryer oil, rotten meat, and stale donuts) set out in bait piles by hunters who want an assured kill. One third of these feeding bears are female, many with tiny cubs. Often the female bears hide the cubs before approaching the bait site or kill zone. Despite being illegal for hunters to kill female bears with cubs, inevitably it happens and orphaned cubs are left to starve to death.

“The cruelty is amplified by the fact that the spring hunt will not reduce human/bear conflicts, as Ontario bear researchers have shown” Woodyer continued. “Yes, cubs will be orphaned during this unnecessary hunt. Minister Orazietti knows that studies done by his own staff show that spring hunts do not reduce human/bear conflicts.”

The organizations also distributed a chart showing steadily declining numbers of bear complaints in the Minister’s home city of Sault Ste Marie. The numbers were obtained from the Sault police force through a Freedom of Information request. “We agree with the Minister that public safety for northern residents is crucial, we don’t agree that the spring bear hunt is the effective way to do it,” said Liz White, Director, Animal Alliance of Canada. Ms. White concluded,“That’s why we have asked the Minister to re-instate and recommit to the entire Bear Wise programme. In communities like Elliot Lake, where the Bear Wise programme was properly implemented, human bear conflicts dropped dramatically

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To schedule interviews or obtain copies of the Sault Ste MarieDo bear occurrence data or legal filings, please contact Liz White at 416-809-4371 or liz@animalalliance.ca  

Documents are also available on the web sites of Animal Alliance (www.animalalliance.ca) or Zoocheck Canada (www.zoocheck.com)

 

 

Bears Matter Fundraiser Continues ALL Year Round at Country Club Centre in Nanaimo

 

bearsmatterlogo

News Alert!  Bernard Callebaut Chocolate Store in  Country Club Centre in Nanaimo is now continuing the sale of Warm Buddy Products to raise money for the Bears Matter Fund!  Half the proceeds from the sales will go to bears!

Please check out the FULL selection of Warm Buddy Warm Up Animals, wraps, robs, slippers, baby blankets etc… No tax has to be charged.  All credits and debit cards accepted!  Thank you for continuing to help the bears in this way. 

January NOTE from Christmas Fundraiser! Thank you to EVERYONE who came by the Bears Matter Booth in the month of December! Together we raised $5,300 plus $2,500 from Warm Buddy! Atleast 1,000 people were reached and 400 certificates given out. Stay tuned for other initiatives going forward in 2014! Of course Bear Hugs to Warm Buddy and Country Club Centre-Nanaimo, wouldnt have happened wout you!Dec'13Sale

Photo: Bears Matter Booth Dec 2013 

Fundraiser/Sale from November 29 to December 24, 2013

Country Club Centre, 3200 North Island Hwy, Nanaimo

BearsMatterPosterFundraiser'13Smcertificate

A Free Certificate of Appreciation will be given out for every purchase of a Warm Buddy Product or Donation.  NEW! WildlifeSOS-India will be added this year to help the Sloth Bear making Eight Conservation Groups to benefit from this fundraiser.

 

 

Robyn Appleton,Climbing with Bears in Peru, Deep Cove’s Raven Pub, North Vancouver November 24’13 @7pm

Climbing with Bears 7 years in Peru w Robyn Appleton

Climbing with Bears 7 years in Peru w Robyn Appleton

Since 2006, Robyn Appleton, resident of Squamish, B.C. and UBC PhD student has been climbing and studying the rare and endangered Spectacled Bear in the tropical dry forests of North-Western Peru. She will be sharing with us her adventures and research thru amazing stories, photos and video clips of the climbing bears, people and landscape of Peru.

Robyn has been working with a film crew for the past few years and will be featured in the up and coming BEARTREK Film next year! See clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li2VJWKp5aM 
There is no other bear species in the world that would scale rock faces like this. You are in for a very unique and memorable evening!

Peruvian Hand-Crafted Products for Sale before and after each show! All sales will help support The Spectacled Bear Conservation Society. Help us save the endangered Spectacled (Andean) Bear while giving a much needed boost to the economy of the remote communities of  north-western  Peru. It’s your chance to purchase one of the unique hand woven textiles, carved mates, hand felted animals and birds, sterling silver jewelry, hand knit or wooden toys and much more…

Raven Pub, Deep Cove, November 24 @ 7pm. 1060 Deep Cove Rd, North Vancouver               (604)929-3834 Free!        http://www.theravenpub.com

Robyn Appleton www.sbc-peru.org  

 

Robyn Appleton, Climbing with Bears in Peru – Whistler Millennium Place, Nov.29’13

     

RANov29'13SMPoster, resident of Squamish, B.C. and UBC PhD student has been climbing and studying the rare and endangered Spectacled Bear in the tropical dry forests of North-Western Peru. She will be sharing with us her adventures and research thru amazing stories, photos and video clips of the climbing bears, people and landscape of Peru.

Robyn has been working with a film crew for the past few years and will be featured in the up and coming BEARTREK Film next year! See clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li2VJWKp5aM 
There is no other bear species in the world that would scale rock faces like this. You are in for a very unique and memorable evening!

Peruvian Hand-Crafted Products for Sale before and after each show! All sales will help support The Spectacled Bear Conservation Society. Help us save the endangered Spectacled (Andean) Bear while giving a much needed boost to the economy of the remote communities of  north-western  Peru. It’s your chance to purchase one of the unique hand woven textiles, carved mates, hand felted animals and birds, sterling silver jewelry, hand knit or wooden toys and much more…

Millennium Place, Whistler, November 29 @ 7pm-9pm, Show 7:30pm,                                    4335 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC (604) 935-8410 Admission by Donation http://www.artswhistler.com/events/robyn-appleton-climbing-with-bears-in-peru

Robyn Appleton www.sbc-peru.org