Category Archives: Newspaper Article

BC NDP Takes Aim at $60,000 Donation by Trophy Hunters for BC Liberals Election Campaign-The Straight Article

Read Article: http://www.straight.com/news/885131/bc-ndp-takes-aim-60000-donation-trophy-hunters-bc-liberal-election-campaign  by Carlito Pablo on March 22nd, 2017 at 3:21 PM

grizzly_bear_photo_by_bc_parks

Grizzly bear trophy hunters have contributed money to help B.C. Liberals win the election this year, says a B.C. NDP representative.

Provincial NDP leader John Horgan says it’s time to end grizzly-bear hunts in B.C.
Statistics reveal decade-long increase in B.C. hunting licences for grizzlies and black bears
Activists and Lush Cosmetics team up to make film about ending B.C.’s trophy hunt of grizzly bears
Martyn Brown: The grisly business of trophy hunting in Super, Natural British Columbia
Can grizzly bear watchers end B.C.’s trophy hunt?

George Heyman cited a report by the public interest organization Dogwood about a $60,000 kitty put together by U.S. and Canadian chapters of Safari Club International.
The New Democrat MLA for Vancouver-Fairview said that Dogwood’s information came from a Facebook post showing a cheque made out by the hunters to the Guide Outfitters Association of B.C. (GOABC)

According to Heyman, the fund is supposedly meant to assist the guide outfitters association “reelect the Liberal government in B.C., so the trophy hunt continues”.
“Clearly [B.C. Liberal Premier] Christy Clark is happy to have outside organization spends tens of thousands of dollars to help her get reelected, and ignore the desires of the majority of British Columbians to end the trophy hunt of grizzly bears,” Heyman told the Georgia Straight in a phone interview Wednesday (March 22).
In November last year, the B.C. NDP promised that it will end the sport killing of grizzly bears if the party wins the May 9, 2017 provincial election.
“We’ve pledged very clearly that when were elected, we will ban the trophy hunt, and that we’ll work with First Nations such as in the Great Bear Rainforest,” Heyman said.
The Straight called GOABC and requested comment from executive director Scott Ellis. He has yet to return a call as of this posting.
A 2016 report by the GOABC titled ‘Grizzly Bear Management in British Columbia’ stated that hunters harvest less than two percent of the grizzly population

Read Full Article:http://www.straight.com/news/885131/bc-ndp-takes-aim-60000-donation-trophy-hunters-bc-liberal-election-campaign

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Larry Pynn: Guide Outfitters (Association of B.C.) Rile NFL Team & Environmental Group with Bid to Trademark ‘Bears Matter’

Update August 08, 2017 from Bears Matter: NFL Team has abandoned their opposition to this trade mark application by the GOABC. Myself, Barb Murray, who has operated the non-profit business Bears Matter for in excess of 8 years has filed an amended opposition statement and is preparing evidence to present at the end of October’17.  There is an filing ,under my name, to oppose this ‘trade mark’ application by the Guide Outfitters Association of BC.

http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/b-c-guide-outfitters-rile-nfl-team-environmental-group-with-bid-to-trademark-bears-matter

Larry Pynn
(Vancouver Sun)
Published: January 17, 2017
Updated: January 18, 2017 7:07 PM

ProvPaperPhotoJan'17                                                                                   A grizzly bear with a cub is on high alert near Whistler in August 2015. Photo by Richard MacKellar

Bears matter. Everyone agrees on that. But when it comes to who owns the legal rights to those two words, the debate is extending from the wilderness hunting grounds of B.C. all the way to the playing fields of the NFL.
The Guide Outfitters Association of B.C., which caters to foreign trophy hunters seeking to kill grizzlies and other big-game animals, has applied to the Canadian Intellectual Property Office for the trademark rights to the name, Bears Matter.
Problem is, a long-standing B.C. environmental group opposed to the trophy hunt of bears already uses that name and plans to write the Property Office this week to officially register its opposition.
Camille Labchuk, a lawyer and executive director of Animal Justice, which is helping Bears Matter (bearsmatter.com) file its complaint, said in an interview it’s “galling” to think the outfitters might “steal their name.”
Labchuk said her client never formally registered the name: “They don’t have to be entitled to legal protections, though, as they can rely on common-law protections for their trademark as well. It’s pretty common that groups don’t formally register.”

The professional football team, the Chicago Bears, has already officially registered its opposition.
The Property Office website indicates that the outfitters filed for the name Bears Matter on Nov. 4, 2014, but that their bid was advertised in the Trade-marks Journal only on Oct. 12, 2016. The Chicago Bears filed its proposed opposition on Jan. 6, 2017, and received an extension of time to file its formal complaint until March 12, 2017.
Jim Christman, media relations manager for the team, didn’t respond to an interview request.
The growing controversy seems lost on Scott Ellis, executive director of the Surrey-based Guide Outfitters, who said that his group has registered all manner of domains and trademarks over the years.
Among them: Conservation Matters, registered in 2014; Knock Your Socks Off, 2009; Mountain Hunter, 2011; Wildlife Stewardship is our Priority, 2011; and Fair Chase … No Fences, 2011. The organization hosts three websites — goabc.org, mountainhuntermagazine.com and bearsinbc.com.
“It’s part of our business process to protect whatever intellectual property we have,” he said. “We bundle as much around to drive traffic to bears in B.C. as we can. We’re not trying to get any name from anyone. I don’t know anything about the environmental group, Bears Matter. I don’t know what you’re talking about.”
He added: “I would much rather talk that bears matter than someone’s trademark. That’s all crap.”
Established by Barb Murray of Nanoose Bay in 2006, Bears Matter says in a mission statement posted online: “We are B.C. voters speaking up for grizzly bears who are still being legally killed.” It supports Pacific Wild’s petition to Premier Christy Clark to ban the grizzly trophy hunt.
Murray said she was very active on the grizzly trophy hunt issue in 2014 and finds it hard to believe the outfitters don’t know of her group.
She said she never registered Bears Matter as a non-profit society to issue tax-deductible receipts because it would have restricted her political activism on bear issues.
lpynn@postmedia.com

 

Mike Smyth Column: Election Showdown looms over BC Grizzly Hunting Oct 23, 2016

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A report by two out-of-province scientists say the grizzly hunt in B.C. is sustainable and that the bear population is being well managed. But an overwhelming majority in B.C want to see the hunt banned. Jonathan Hayward / THE CANADIAN PRESS

http://theprovince.com/opinion/columnists/election-showdown-looms-over-b-c-grizzly-bear-hunting

Three years ago, Vancouver art collector Michael Audain was sitting on a log in the rain in the Great Bear Rainforest when something magical happened.

A mother grizzly bear and her three cubs walked by, on their way to feast on spawning salmon in a nearby river.

“She must have known we were there, but she was completely calm and didn’t show the slightest interest in us,” said Audain, the wealthy chairman of Polygon Homes.

“She just ambled slowly by and it was amazingly close — 15 to 20 feet away. It moved me so much I thought, ‘I have to look into this. Maybe there’s something I can do to help safeguard these wonderful creatures.
’ It changed my life.”

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Guilty Plea from Clayton Stoner, $10K Fine & 3 yr Hunting Ban

Protesters against illegal poaching and hunting gather outside B.C. Provincial Court before Anaheim Ducks defenceman Clayton Stoner was expected to enter a plea in Vancovuer Friday Nov. 13, 2015. Stoner is charged with five counts under the Wildlife Act after a grizzly bear was killed on the central coast in 2013. Photograph by: Darryl Dyck, CP

Protesters against illegal poaching and hunting gather outside B.C. Provincial Court before Anaheim Ducks defenceman Clayton Stoner was expected to enter a plea in Vancovuer Friday Nov. 13, 2015. Stoner is charged with five counts under the Wildlife Act after a grizzly bear was killed on the central coast in 2013.
Photograph by: Darryl Dyck, CP

Update by Bears Forever Organization on the Outcome of the Clayton Stoner Case.  He was found guilty of holding a resident Limited Entry Hunt tag for a grizzly bear when he was not a resident of the province at that time …Mr. Stoner was fined $10,000 and banned from hunting in B.C. for three years. From facebook page of Bears Forever https://www.facebook.com/bearsforeverbc

As everyone celebrates Clayton Stoner being sentenced today, here are some things to bear in mind:

 

1) Trophy hunting is not illegal under Settler law. Stoner has simply been found guilty of hunting with the wrong kind of license. We need to make this illegal under Settler law so the activity stops completely.

2) Stoner is also guilty of contravening the Indigenous ban on trophy hunting under Indigenous law, and the Settler courts have no jurisdiction over that.

3) No one would have caught Stoner in the first place if First Nations hadn’t been investing their money and energy in monitoring hunt activity. The Province has NO capacity to effectively regulate or monitor the hunt. That burden falls to us.

4) Justice for the Grizzly shot by Stoner, is important. But what we’re fighting for with the Bears Forever campaign is justice for ALL bears. That won’t happen until the province regulates an end to the hunt. And we won’t stop our work until they do.

You can find out more about what we’re doing at bearsforever.ca

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NHL star’s court fight over grizzly a ‘tipping point’ for trophy hunt ban

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Grizzly bears in Great Bear Rainforest. Photo by Sophie Wright.

 October 9th 2015

For Full Story with photos and video clips go to: http://www.nationalobserver.com/2015/10/09/news/nhl-stars-court-fight-over-grizzly-tipping-point%E2%80%99-trophy-hunt-ban 

On Friday, a judge postponed a court case regarding five charges that NHL hockey defencemen Clayton Stoner is facing related to an incident that has become highly symbolic in a public campaign to end the controversial grizzly bear trophy hunt in British Columbia.

During a 2013 hunting trip to his home province, the hockey star was spectacularly photographed holding a dead grizzly bear’s head and claws. The incident provoked scorn from indigenous and environmental groups, but government investigators also believe Stoner’s hunting permit was not valid.

The hearing is now delayed until Nov.13, but grizzly bear advocates are thrilled —they see it as yet another chance to shine a bright light on the B.C. Liberal government’s permitting of the controversial sport killing of grizzlies. “If Mr. Stoner wants to (delay this) for the next two years until the next provincial election be my guest.” said Barb Murray with Bears Matter outside a Vancouver court building on Friday. 
“He’s an international hockey player. He’s famous, Canadian-born and bred, and held up as an example for kids. Wrong!”
 

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Vancouver Sun Editorial: Time for province to end grizzly bear hunt

http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/editorials/editorial+time+province+grizzly+bear+hunt/11356982/story.html

Sept 11, 2015

One bear is not proof of a trend; however, the sighting near Whistler of a female grizzly with cub is welcome news.

Extirpated from much of its historic range, the province’s largest terrestrial carnivore remains a species of special concern, threatened by habitat loss and human activity. So sighting a fertile female in a region where wildlife managers hope a grizzly population can regenerate is cause for cautious optimism.

That’s the good news, even if it comes with the imperative for Whistler hikers and campers to become bear-aware regarding the risks and what to do in an encounter.

The bad news is provincial authorities continue to promote the slaughter of grizzlies to satisfy the vanity of trophy hunters.

The province estimated in 2012 that B.C. had 15,075 grizzlies, fewer than 100 in the southwest region. Yet some grizzly advocates believe populations are over-estimated, deaths under-estimated and that every bear killed is one death too many. One biologist argues that rigorous grizzly population estimates have been done in only 12 per cent of B.C. Another paper published by four B.C.-based wildlife biologists in 2013 found excessive mortality levels in 19 per cent of the cases studied. It worried that excessive mortality might really occur in 70 per cent.

Such fears are amplified by reports the province has been increasing hunting effort on grizzly bears. The number of licenses issued since 2005 for grizzly hunting apparently increased by 58 per cent.

It’s no surprise that First Nations on the north central coast where grizzlies concentrate to exploit large annual salmon runs are now vowing to take whatever steps necessary to enforce bans on what they deem unethical trophy hunting in their traditional territories. They have a strong economic case, too. First Nations seek to build a sustainable, long-term tourist industry in the region based on wildlife viewing. This is a sound business plan. The Wilderness Tourism Association of B.C. says ecotourism is already worth $1.5 billion a year to the province and growing rapidly. By comparison, trophy killing grizzlies brings in about $116 million a year and is severely constrained by harvest quotas. In other words, trophy hunting is worth peanuts and has little growth potential compared with wildlife viewing.

Not long ago, an American trophy hunter revolted the world by killing Cecil, a Zimbabwean lion. One week of wildlife viewing of Cecil from a nearby lodge generated more income for Zimbabwe than the hunter who paid only once to kill the lion. The tourist revenue would have flowed for the rest of the lion’s natural life. This fact lends weight to First Nations’ arguments. They experienced a similarly wasteful loss in 2013 when a grizzly named Cheeky was killed by a trophy hunter who cut off his head and paws and left the carcass to rot.

Almost all British Columbians — 87 per cent — oppose trophy hunting grizzly bears. This seems an excellent time for government to revisit what most of the citizens it serves consider a barbaric, wasteful, morally — and economically — indefensible practice.