Category Archives: Trophy Killing of Grizzly Bears

Mike Smyth Column: Election Showdown looms over BC Grizzly Hunting Oct 23, 2016

provincephoto

A report by two out-of-province scientists say the grizzly hunt in B.C. is sustainable and that the bear population is being well managed. But an overwhelming majority in B.C want to see the hunt banned. Jonathan Hayward / THE CANADIAN PRESS

http://theprovince.com/opinion/columnists/election-showdown-looms-over-b-c-grizzly-bear-hunting

Three years ago, Vancouver art collector Michael Audain was sitting on a log in the rain in the Great Bear Rainforest when something magical happened.

A mother grizzly bear and her three cubs walked by, on their way to feast on spawning salmon in a nearby river.

“She must have known we were there, but she was completely calm and didn’t show the slightest interest in us,” said Audain, the wealthy chairman of Polygon Homes.

“She just ambled slowly by and it was amazingly close — 15 to 20 feet away. It moved me so much I thought, ‘I have to look into this. Maybe there’s something I can do to help safeguard these wonderful creatures.
’ It changed my life.”

Continue reading

Trophy Film – Trailer by Lush Cosmetics Co.,

In North America, hundreds of grizzly bears are killed for sport by trophy hunters every year. This “sport” is outdated, wasteful and inherently cruel. Trophy examines the effect that trophy hunting has on the people, land and animals. Can we truly justify killing these animals for sport (or for any reason? except in extraordinary circumstances) To see the complete 28min documentary go to: http://www.trophyfilm.com/watchthefilm Please sign the petition at the end of documentary. Thank you, Barb of Bears Matter

BC Almanac Podcast with Justice for BC Grizzlies and Others on August 17, 2016

Copy of val - Copy                JusticeforBCGrizzliesLogo

Val Murray  of Justice for BC Grizzlies      Logo for Justice for BC Grizzlies

Listen to podcast at 17:20mark to hear arguments from all sides re: grizzly hunt in BC  – Introducing the new concerned citizen’s group Justice for BC Grizzlies

podcast.cbc.cahttp://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/bcalmanac_20160817_31168.mp3

Go to: www.justiceforbcgrizzlies.com. Facebook: @justiceforbcgrizzlies  Twitter @justice4bcgrizz email: justiceforbcgrizzlies@telus.net

 

 

 

Charlie Russell: Discoverying the True Nature of the Grizzly Bear, YouTube Video March’16

 

Copy of Russell40Copy of Russell40Copy of Russell40Copy of Russell40CharlieRussell

Hello B.C. Bear Friends,Copy of Russell40

A gift to ALL! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLpyFH1Y-aA&feature=youtu.be

A 46 minute long video and so well worth the view. We must really LISTEN carefully to Charlie Russell’s words and step up ourselves to tell the true story about grizzlies.

We must NOW take Charlie Russell’s life’s message to our politicians, candidates and voters with as much conviction, commitment and passion as he has shown all these years. Now in his mid-seventies, Charlie is still fighting for the grizzlies and we must fight along side him. We have to finally bring peace to our grizzlies in British Columbia and end the killing.

Once we end the killing of grizzlies in our backyard we can help grizzlies in other jurisdictions.
Enjoy and Share,

Justice for BC Grizzlies – Citizen’s Campaign’17 www.justiceforbcgrizzlies.com justiceforbcgrizzlies@telus.net
facebook: @justiceforbcgrizzlies
twitter: @justice4bcgrizz

Note: YouTube Video: Published on Mar 29, 2016 by Wilderness Wildlife and Human Interaction Cochrane Research Institute, Discovering the true nature of the Grizzly Bear

Natural Liberty; Grizzlies Deserve the Right to Live…..Blog by Justice for BC Grizzlies

Someone commented to me recently, “Bears haven’t changed one bit. It’s people that have changed. Bears are still doing what bears have done for thousands of years”. It’s so true.

Wild animals are essentially ownerless in their natural settings. But from early days when nobility and settler groups assumed land title, they also laid claim to all that lived upon those lands. This essentially continues today in the form of provincial authority over Crown lands, which lumps wildlife in with oil, gas, trees, minerals; every form of “resource” extraction.

Consider these observations:

The majority of BC residents are opposed to trophy hunting of Grizzly Bears. Yet other than a short, four-month moratorium on grizzly hunting by the NDP government in 2001, trophy hunting has continued in BC. The government is assumed to hold Crown* land “in public trust” for present and future generations but clearly does not have social license to kill grizzlies. It may even be considered a violation of public trust.

* It must be noted that ~ 95% of the land base in BC is unceded territories of First Nations who take issue with the concept of Crown lands.

*****

Animal law is a field of legal practice that is still young and growing. Few lawyers represent the interests of animals but those who do, do so because they believe that sentient beings deserve their natural liberty and are not property or “chattel”.

*****

The now famous CREST (The Center for Responsible Travel) report of 2014 assessed bear viewing in the Great Bear Rainforest at 12 times more profitable than bear (trophy) hunting. Grizzlies more than “earn their keep” in the province.

*****

All of which lines up on the side of leaving grizzlies in peace to do what they have done for thousands of years.

It’s no stretch to call it an evolutionary impulse, this desire to see animals live in peace. And now is the time. A different attitude exists today than in 1888, for instance, when a black bear cub on Stanley Park grounds was chained to a stump and became the first inhabitant of the zoo. That was acceptable then, as was the donation of four Arctic polar bears to the zoo by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1962. That simply could not be done in BC today without an activist movement opposing it. And that’s how it should be.

In 2016, it’s justice for Grizzly Bears to have their natural liberty; to eat, play, rest and lumber freely on their home ranges.

Taken from https://justiceforbcgrizzlies.com July 7, 2016

Bear Viewing Today and Always posted by Justice for BC Grizzlies

 

2015 09 05_0715

“ I’m afraid to even breathe.”

This, uttered in the smallest of whispers by a substantially large, typically exuberant Australian fellow sitting next to me in our open skiff, as we quietly bobbed offshore from where a young female Grizzly Bear dined on her stick full of breakfast mussels.

It’s what happens when I view grizzlies on their home range. It makes me want to hold my breath, to keep the spell going; it’s downright intoxicating.

Many people have never seen a grizzly close enough to actually observe their behavior, hear them chew and huff, see them scent the wind and gain a sense of the individuality of these creatures. They look so different from one another in colour, markings, body language and general carriage. They are intensely focused on food, which stands to reason when you consider how much grass, grubs, mice, bark, mushrooms, bulbs, insects, fruit, seeds, carrion and fish (sometimes) it takes to fill a bear’s belly. With plenty of food and no threats, they just go about their business.

Likely, most politicians have never observed a bear in such a way. In fact, the image of grizzlies that they hold may be rooted in misconceptions of fear and misunderstanding. Yet these same politicians are making policy decisions about the fate of grizzlies.

Re-framing mindsets about Grizzly Bears is a service to humanity. Consider this: that magical moment of wanting to whisper in the presence of a grizzly touches part of our brain that soothes the “fight or flight” response and bathes the nervous system with compassion and understanding. We make better decisions in such a state; that’s good for us and good for the grizzlies.

Caring about Grizzly Bears is a window into caring for all of Nature, of which we all are part.

by Valerie Murray for https://JusticeforBCGrizzlies June 21, 2016