Category Archives: Trophy Killing of Grizzly Bears

Bears Matter Invites YOU to SeaLegacy’s Campaign to Stop Grizzly Killing in B.C.!

The half-hearted grizzly hunting moratorium in B.C. is not enough. We need to end hunting of all grizzly bears, forever

NicklenGrizzlies

At SeaLegacy, we are not going to be sidetracked by the B.C. government’s half-hearted decision to put a 2018 moratorium on the grizzly bear hunt, and we will continue to rally support until the government takes the killing of these majestic bears seriously.
In a months’s time, from the close of 2017’s hunting season on November 30th, the government of British Columbia is claiming to have banned all hunting of grizzlies within the Great Bear Rainforest of the mid central coast. While we recognise this step in the right direction, they have left a gaping and unnecessary loophole that is bound to be exploited: grizzly bears can still be hunted for meat.

This move is a glaring attempt to stay true to their campaign promise while still allowing trophy hunters to kill apex predators in B.C.’s territory. The government claims there are approximately 15,000 grizzlies in B.C. and hunters kill about 250 every year.
Natural Resources Minister Doug Donaldson has stated, “Hunters will no longer be able to possess the hide or the head or the paws of the bear, so we feel quite confident that this announcement will mean the end of the grizzly bear trophy hunt through the province.”
At SeaLegacy we know these immense, solitary creatures are more fragile than most people believe, requiring 4,000 square kilometres each as territory.
They are an umbrella species whose health can help determine the health of an entire ecosystem. To hunt them is anything but noble, and we want to add our voice to the loud chorus of British Columbians and citizens of the world who understand their value beyond a hide on a wall or a meal on a plate. After a recent week of filming brown bears in Alaska, SeaLegacy co-founder Paul Nicklen recalled his time working with these great brown bears.

Read More, See Stunning Photos and Take Action by going to https://act.sealegacy.org/s/stop-the-trophy-hunt

International trophy hunting organization accused of influencing vancouver sun poll on grizzly hunt

Link: https://www.facebook.com/StoptheGrizzlyKilling/

Not satisfied with killing animals around the globe, they’re trying to pressure BC to allow more Grizzlies to be senselessly slaughtered. American trophy killers trying to influence policy in our province. Enough is enough!
Read this article to learn more, and please share this far and wide.
We need people like you to protect BC’s Grizzlies. Please email the following newly elected representatives and let them know that BC residents STRONGLY disagree with Grizzly killing in any part of our province. Packing the meat out is an unacceptable loophole that will be easily exploited, and wealthy trophy killers will continue to slaughter our majestic Grizzly bears for kicks. Despicable!
Adam Olsen – Adam.olsen.MLA@leg.bc.ca
Minister Doug Donaldson – FLNR.Minister@gov.bc.ca
Minister George Heyman – ENV.minister@gov.bc.ca
Premier John Horgan – Premier@gov.bc.ca
Andrew Weaver – Andrew.weaver.mla@leg.bc.ca
Sonia Furstenau (Green MLA) – Sonia.furstenau.MLA@leg.bc

Clayton Stoner

Aug 16, 2017 Vancouver Sun Article by Larry Pynn http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/international-trophy-hunting-organization-accused-of-influencing-vancouver-sun-poll-on-grizzly-hunt

An international trophy-hunting organization is being criticized for trying to influence a Vancouver Sun online poll on the NDP government ban on the grizzly trophy hunt.
The 50,000-member, U.S.-based Safari Club International (SCI) has posted a tweet designed to rally its supporters, saying: “Your help is needed to support grizzly hunting! Click on this link and vote ‘NO’ at the end of the article!”

SccreenShotSCIAug'17 Screen Shot taken on Twitter by Bears Matter
The Sun’s poll asks: “Are you happy with the B.C. NDP’s plan to ban the grizzly trophy hunt?” It then asks readers to choose between one of two statements: “Yes — Killing bears for sport is senseless;” or “No — A lot of people depend on the hunt to make a living.”
As of Wednesday afternoon, the two positions were running pretty much neck-and-neck, whereas professionally conducted public opinion polls on the issue have shown overwhelming support for ending the hunt.
SCI also issued two news releases this week, arguing that “sustainable management of wildlife in British Columbia was sucker-punched” and accusing the government of “bowing to the bluster of anti-hunters” and ignoring “all sound science that supports a continuation of grizzly bear hunting in that province.”

On Monday, the NDP government made good on a high-profile election promise by announcing a B.C.-wide ban on trophy hunting of grizzly bears, while allowing hunting to continue for meat outside the Great Bear Rainforest.
Trish Boyum, a coastal ecotourism operator and strong advocate of ending the grizzly trophy hunt, urged SCI to butt out of B.C.’s affairs. “We in no way agree with Safari Club being involved in any decision making regarding wildlife in British Columbia,” she said. “This is what happens when we allow these kinds of people to have their way in our province.”

B.C. grizzly hunter calls new provincial ban wasteful, hurtful to local economies
Boyum noted that she is associated with the Facebook page, Stop the Grizzly Killing, boasting 46,000 followers. She isn’t urging them to respond to The Sun’s poll, which she considers poorly worded and unscientific.

 

B.C.’s Trophy Hunt Ban a Good Step but Loophole Puts Bears at Risk

August 15, 2017
VANCOUVER — B.C.’s cancellation of the grizzly bear trophy hunt is a good step but a loophole that allows hunting the bears for meat is cause for concern, according to the David Suzuki Foundation. The province-wide ban goes into effect on November 30, following this year’s hunting season. It will not prohibit hunters from killing grizzly bears for meat outside of the Great Bear Rainforest.

“We really hoped provisions to ban the hunt in the Great Bear Rainforest would apply to the whole province,” said David Suzuki Foundation Ontario and Northern Canada director Faisal Moola. “The government’s decision means hundreds of grizzly bears will be spared, and that is welcome news. Their pelts, paws, heads and other body parts will no longer be displayed by foreign or local hunters as trophies.”
Bear experts have long known that keeping grizzly populations healthy means protecting their habitat and ensuring humans do not needlessly kill them.

“Although this decision will help reduce the numbers of grizzly bears killed by humans, the provision allowing them to be killed for meat means bears will still be killed,” Moola said. “Grizzly bears are a federally ranked species at risk and it is unclear how a grizzly bear food hunt could be regulated and enforced to ensure hunters do not needlessly shoot bears.”

The David Suzuki Foundation has campaigned for an end to killing of grizzly bears for close to 15 years. It has published numerous scientific studies on the controversial practice, mobilized thousands of B.C. residents in opposition to the trophy hunt and last year successfully convinced B.C.’s auditor general to open an investigation into trophy hunt management and other grizzly bear policies.

A century ago, 35,000 grizzly bears lived in British Columbia and flourished from Alaska to Mexico and east across the Prairies. Today, only about 15,000 grizzly bears inhabit B.C. and have been eliminated from the Lower Mainland, the Okanagan and around Fort St. John.

Grizzlies are highly sensitive to human impacts such as loss and fragmentation of their forest and mountain habitats by clearcuts, roads, oil and gas pipelines and other industrial infrastructure. Female bears reproduce later in life and often produce only a small number of cubs that survive into adulthood. Grizzlies travel long distances to find food, putting them at risk of coming into contact with hunters, roads, towns and other human encroachments into their habitat.
Unlike B.C.’s plan, the Alberta government has maintained a moratorium on all grizzly bear hunting since 2006. Grizzly bear hunting is also banned in the continental United States. B.C. grizzly populations remain healthy in many parts of the province, but independent analyses have found widespread overkilling of bears in some areas and at rates that exceed government limits.
– 30 —
Media contacts:
Faisal Moola, Director of Ontario and Northern Canada

http://www.davidsuzuki.org/media/news/2017/08/bcs-trophy-hunt-ban-a-good-step-but-loophole-puts-bears-at-risk/?utm_campaign=grizzlyTrophyHunt-mediaRelease-en-15aug2017&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=page-link

Change.org Petition Update: Another Redneck Trophy Killer sponsored by Under Armour: Jessica Taylor Byers

Wife,Texan Dreamer                                                                                           Please take the Pledge at: https://www.change.org/p/boycott-under-armour-until-they-stop-killing-wildlife-take-the-pledge/u/20965492?recruiter=15838118&utm_source=share_update&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=share_twitter_responsive&utm_term=petition_update

Ban Trophy Hunting Pacific Palisades, CA

Remember, Under Armour makes all this possible. #BoycottUnderArmour and spread the word!

Jessica Taylor Byer’s Trophy Killer Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/followherarrow

Under Armour Hunt Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/UAHunt

 

CBC: Future of B.C.’s grizzly trophy hunt uncertain as fall hunt approaches

grizzly-bear-near-bella-coolaA grizzly bear is seen fishing for salmon along the Atnarko river in Tweedsmuir Provincial Park near Bella Coola, B.C. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)http://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4220550
NDP promised to end the controversial hunt, but few details on how and when the ban would be implemented  Roshini Nair – CBC News July 25, 2017

The NDP promised to end B.C.’s grizzly bear trophy hunt, but with the September hunt rapidly approaching there are few details to explain how or when that would happen.

B.C.’s grizzly bear trophy hunt allows both resident and non-resident hunters to purchase a licence to hunt a grizzly bear for sport according to a predetermined quota.

License cost varies according to whether the hunter is a B.C. resident ($80) or not ($1000). Non-residents are also required to employ a registered guide outfitter. The trophy hunt takes place in the spring and fall.

Last November, Premier John Horgan made a campaign promise he would end the controversial hunt, promising full protection for the “majestic animals.  “But with the hunt scheduled in September, the deadline to pass a ban is imminent.

Political flashpoint

The former Liberal government maintained the hunt has a positive economic impact — supporting local outfitters and tourist operations — and that the grizzly population is healthy enough to absorb the hunt.

Mark Werner, the vice-president of the Guide Outfitters Association of B.C., said the hunt is an important part of the province’s heritage. “This country and this province [were] built on trapping, hunting and fishing,” he said. “We have a lot of heritage here. We have a lot of culture here.”

Continue reading

Where Greens, NDP & LIberals Stand on Trophy Hunt of Grizzlies May 9th, 2017 BC Election

 

Now we have another study that indicates our pig-headed and intransigent government is on the wrong side of the public’s desires with respect to its peculiar enthusiasm for endorsing trophy hunting of a species that has already been extirpated from much of its range. Photograph by: JONATHAN HAYWARD, THE CANADIAN PRESSSayzuRedCloudStopthetrophyhuntlogo

Summary of Policies by Three Political Parties written by a bear conservationist.

Christy Clark’s BC Liberals:

The BC Liberals have been in power for 15 years and have steadfastly refused to make changes to their policy around bear hunting. They continue to authorize the slaughter of, on average, 300-350 grizzly bears and several thousand black bears per year claiming that it’s “science-based and well-managed”. They have now committed to end bear hunting within the Great Bear Rainforest. While this sounds like a step in the right direction, the important word is within. They have only agreed to work with Coastal First Nations, an umbrella group of 10 coastal first nations, to end the hunting of bears within their traditional territory provided they, along with Raincoast Conservation Foundation, buy out the commercial hunting rights at a cost of millions of dollars. This represents roughly only 1/3 of the area of the Great Bear Rainforest. For the rest of the GBR and BC it will be slaughter as usual. It’s unclear whether they will increase the kill in other areas to make up for the reduction in the GBR grizzly hunt.

Andrew Weaver and the Green Party:
Despite the policy stated in the Green Book (the policy manual of the BC Green Party) which is to “Ban trophy hunting and restrict any hunting of species threatened by trophy hunting. Eliminate sport and trophy hunting of grizzly bears”, Andrew Weaver continues to tout his “pack the meat out ” policy as an end to trophy hunting. The Green Party position is essentially that it’s acceptable to kill 350 grizzly bears each year as long as they pack “edible portions” out, take them to their home and pretend that they’re going to eat it. In a recent Vancouver Sun interview he also said he supports the Liberal position on the grizzly hunt and alluded to the possibility that they might have to kill some of the big males if there are too many of them. He continues to use deceptive language labelling “foreign hunters” as trophy hunters and BC residents as simply “hunters.” In fact, two out of three grizzly bears slaughtered for trophies in BC are killed by BC resident hunters. Provincial mortality statistics show that from 1978 through 2011, BC resident hunters killed 5,900 grizzlies while non-resident hunters killed 4,100.

John Horgan and the NDP:
The NDP took a bold step prior to the dropping of the writ, and said they would ban the trophy hunting of grizzly bears in British Columbia. However, they left some wiggle room in the language around that, stating they were leaving room for some BC resident hunters to get permits to hunt bears for food. Although that appears to leave the door open for BC residents to continue to slaughter grizzly bears as long as they “pack the meat out”, statements made by John Horgan in interviews since the original press conference indicate he is promising that these will be given out only in exceptional circumstances and may include a provision where they would have to surrender the trophy parts. So despite lots of talk about ending the trophy hunting of bears in BC, by all three parties, the NDP promises, while not definitive, appear to be the most substantial and sincere.

Here are some other really important facts to consider about the bear hunt in BC:

Despite claims by the BC Liberal government that the annual slaughter of 300-350 magnificent beings (who are defenseless against modern access and technology), is science based and well managed,
1: the gov’t population estimates that the hunt is based on are derived from extrapolation of a too-small amount of science and rely heavily on “local expert opinion” mostly from local hunters.
2.managers have continually, repeatedly exceeded their own kill targets, especially of female grizzly bears.

Despite claims that hunters take out only old mature males (most past their prime breeding age):
1. 35% …. more than 1 out of 3 …. bears killed for trophies are FEMALE
2. The median age of bears killed each year in BC is FIVE years old. HALF of the grizzly bears killed in BC are barely of breeding age!

In poll after poll in British Columbia:
– Over 90% of British Columbia residents don’t support trophy hunting of grizzly bears
– In rural areas where hunting is a prominent activity, 70-80% don’t support trophy hunting of grizzly bears.
– More than 75% of people who self-identify as hunters oppose the trophy hunt of grizzly bears

Despite clear, peer-reviewed, scientific evidence that removing top carnivores from an eco-system is an ineffective and often destructive practice, both the BC Liberals and (sadly) the BC Green Party support trophy hunting and culling wolves and bears as legitimate wildlife “management” tools.

The NDP, alone, have aligned their position on this issue around the values of 90% of the population of British Columbia. While I acknowledge that this is only one issue in this election, if it is important to you, I hope this information is helpful to you when you are deciding how to vote on Tuesday.