Tag Archives: ecotourism

Action Alert: Save BC Wolves from Aerial Killing:Pacific Wild Petitioning B.C. Liberals Premier Christy Clark

BC Government Is getting Ready to Slaughter 180 Wolves over next two months

BC Government Is getting Ready to Slaughter 180 Wolves over next two months

This petition will be delivered to:

B.C. Liberals:Premier Christy Clark,Minister of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource,Hon. Steve Thomson,B.C. Minister of the Environment,Hon. Mary Polak, Green Party Leader,Elizabeth May

Assistant Deputy Minister – Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations,Tom Ethier Conservation Director, Pacific Wild,Ian McAllister

Save B.C. Wolves!

Pacific Wild Denny Island, B.C., Canada

January 15, 2015

B.C. Government green-lights controversial wolf hunt in the South Selkirk and South Peace regions. As many as 184 wolves to be shot from helicopters.

Decades of habitat destruction and human encroachment have left BC’s mountain caribou on the edge of survival. Instead of protecting critical food and habitat for caribou, such as the lichen rich interior forests, the BC government has now placed the blame on wolves. Over 180 wolves are now being targeted for aerial killing in the next two months. These highly social and intelligent animals, icons of our natural heritage, should not be killed because of government negligence. Killing all the wolves in BC won’t bring the caribou back in the absence of habitat protection.

Wolves are highly social and intelligent animals and research shows that predator kill programs increase reproductive rates in wolves and destabilizes pack structure causing more predation of livestock and other non-native prey.

It is the view of Pacific Wild that this announcement is scientifically unsound and that wolves are being used as a scapegoat to divert attention from the fundamental problem of ongoing habitat destruction and displacement caused by human encroachment.

“This is not management, it’s a tax-payer funded kill program of one of our most iconic species.” said Ian McAllister, Conservation Director for Pacific Wild.  “This is not only a horrific day for wolves in British Columbia but a sad day for public engagement and policy that will surely bring international condemnation to our borders.”

*(PLEASE NOTE you are NOT donating to Pacific Wild when asked  after you have signed the petition – you are donating to change.org) 

Please consider DONATING to Pacific Wild’s Save BC Wolves Indiegogo campaign here.
Learn more and support the campaign to end the wolf kill and educate the public about this issue.

Go to: www.pacificwild.org to learn more and take action

Share through social media: @pacificwild #saveBCwolves

Connect with us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter

Contact Pacific Wild: info@pacificwild.org

Pacific Wild is a B.C. based non-profit wildlife conservation organization and a leading advocate for changes to wolf management in British Columbia.   www.pacificwild.org

LETTER TO

B.C. Liberals Premier Christy Clark

Minister of Forest, Lands and Natural Resources Hon. Steve Thomson

B.C. Minister of the Environment Hon. Mary Polak

and 3 others

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May

Assistant Deputy Minister – Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Tom Ethier

Conservation Director, Pacific Wild Ian McAllister

Save B.C. Wolves!

Honourable Minister Steve Thomson 
Honourable Minister Mary Polak
Assistant Deputy Minister Tom Ethier

Read more 

RECENT UPDATES

PETITION UPDATE

Save BC Wolves Campaign

Jan 23, 2015 — British Columbia Wolf Kill Update

Thank you for signing the petition supporting an end to the wolf kill in B.C. We have reached 80,000 names in just a few short days – a truly… Read more

CLICK HERE to support Save B.C. Wolves

Stop the wolf kill, stand up for B.C. wolves. | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!

HTTP://WWW.INDIEGOGO.COM

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Letter to Editor March 5, 2014, End the grizzly bear hunt (in BC)

http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/letters/grizzly+bear+hunt/9579008/story.html 

In a few weeks the annual government-sponsored trophy hunt of grizzly bears commences just as bears emerge from their dens with young in tow. The bears are hungry after their hibernation and easy targets for hunters. Inevitably, female bears are killed, leaving orphaned cubs to starve.

The vast majority of British Columbians, including non-trophy hunters, have been calling on the Christy Clark government to end this senseless killing, but to no avail. Instead, the government announces it will open four additional areas to the grizzly bear trophy hunt this year.

Recently, on CKNW, I listened to photographer and bear-viewing guide John Marriott describe a bear he is familiar with in the Chilcotin region called “Big Momma.” She is huge and very photogenic — he calls her “a photo tour superstar,” but then he adds she will likely be an easy target this spring because she has become used to the presence of humans. She won’t know the difference between a camera and a gun.

A bear is worth more alive than dead. A live bear can be viewed and photographed hundreds of times. We are fortunate to have these majestic, iconic symbols of our B.C. wild. Their lives should be respected. Please visit bearsmatter.com and bearsforever.ca to see what you might do to help end the senseless killing.

JACQUELINE HOHMANN, Surrey

Grizzly bears are a popular tourist attraction at Knight Inlet on the B.C. coast, showing that the two species can safely coexist when humans act predictably. Experts warn that Interior grizzlies not accustomed to congregations of bears at coastal salmon streams require more personal space.

Grizzly bears are a popular tourist attraction at Knight Inlet on the B.C. coast, showing that the two species can safely coexist when humans act predictably. Experts warn that Interior grizzlies not accustomed to congregations of bears at coastal salmon streams require more personal space.

bearsmatterlogo

Conservationists worried about impending bear hunt by Mark Hume-Globe and Mail

 
 
NOTE from BM: Bears Matter Petition Letter to Premier Clark to Ban the Trophy Killing of Grizzly Bears in BC: http://tinyurl.com/ban-grizzly-hunt-2014 
 

“There’s a real variety of bears that we see there. There are bears that are very wild and others that have been [getting used to humans] for years and years,” he said. “We’ve got a bear we call Mom and … she’s had two sets of triplets over the course of my time doing photo tours there. Literally, a hunter could walk up to within 20 feet and shoot her. She has absolutely no concern for human beings at all. Very much like Big Momma. There’s a whole host of bears that we’ve named. It almost makes me sick to my stomach to think someone could go in there and shoot them.”

Mr. Marriott said the Cariboo wildlife units should remain closed because the bears are so vulnerable, and because they support a growing wildlife-viewing business that makes them more valuable alive than dead.

“This is one of the most spectacular bear-viewing places in the world. It’s on par with the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary,” he said, referring to a provincial park on B.C.’s North Coast. “This whole area where they are trying to expand this hunt is … national-park-like stuff. It’s stunningly beautiful.”

In December, the government decided to open the four wildlife management units – two in the Cariboo and two in the Kootenays – to limited spring hunting, starting in April. Garth Mowat, head of the government’s natural resource science and stewardship section in the Kootenay region, said the province routinely closes management units when game populations are threatened.

bearsmatterlogo

CBC Article, Bear Trophy Hunt Opposed at B.C. Legislature Rally

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bear-trophy-hunt-opposed-at-b-c-legislature-rally-1.2538895 - included is Video Clip of Vicky Husband on this issue.

Bears Matter Note-205 letters were signed at Rally -well over 200 attended Rally in the wind and rain…well done!

Dozens gathered at the B.C. legislature Saturday afternoon for a ‘Save B.C. Bears’ rally following a Facebook campaign that organizers say has garnered more than 100 thousand views.

Event organizer Chelsea Turner says she wants to focus attention on the trophy hunt.’”Do we want our province to be branded as a place to shoot iconic species?- event organizer Chelsea Turner

“This is an issue that really engages people,” Turner said.  “It’s something people want to talk about.” 

Turner, who has been advocating for and filming bears since the age of 14, says the vast majority of British Columbians are opposed to hunting them for trophies.

“When the government doesn’t reflect that, it’s a travesty,” she said. “Do we want our province to be branded as the best place on earth’ or as a place to shoot iconic species?”

Save the bearsResearchers say grizzly bears are over hunted in B.C. Kill rates are too high and populations estimates too low.

Turner says the vast majority of tourists come here to see live bears, not hunt them. 

Order of B.C. recipient and long time environmentalist Vicky Husband says the moratorium on grizzly bear hunting that was removed by the Liberal government should be re-instated. 

“The government should be listening to the public.  We do not want to see these bears killed, said Husband.  This is not sport and this is not for food.  The buck stops with Christy Clark and if she’s not listening to the 90 percent of British Columbians who want it banned, who is she listening to?”

B.C. Fish and Wildlife Director Andrew Wilson, said recently in response to these concerns, he’s confident in how grizzly bears are managed and the government’s own analysis, based on the best available science,  supports how government is managing the grizzly bear hunt..

 

 

 

On Feb 15th A Communications Experiment: Tell the Premier Why You Oppose Killing Bears for Trophies

sayZU Samplephoto

Dear Friends,

 It’s not just you.  And, it’s not just conservation groups, not just scientists, and not just First Nations.  

Last summer, public reaction to NHL hockey player Clayton Stoner’s grizzly-head “selfie” made it abundantly clear that British Columbians, including most hunters, are offended by the killing of bears for trophies. Perhaps Clayton’s gruesome conduct reminded us of some terrible criminal act; or maybe we just don’t like people killing animals they aren’t going to eat. But apparently, the BC public don’t think it’s very cool to kill and decapitate a bear just for trophy.  

In fact, according to pollsters, nearly 90 percent of the BC public consider the killing of bears for trophies to be unethical and wrong, and they want it to stop.  Even BC’s leading newspapers are calling on the BC government to end to BC’s trophy hunt for grizzly and black bears.

 And yet, last month the BC government announced that it had decided to expand the trophy hunt for BC bears, starting 10 weeks from now, on April 1st, 2014.  

Evidently, Premier Christy Clark and her advisors are not getting the message.  

 We would therefore like to try something new, a bit of an EXPERIMENT. 

 THE EXPERIMENT: 

On Saturday, February 15th after 2pm until Sunday at Midnight, we invite Canadians to use mobile device to complete one or all three of the tasks below:

 1.  TEXT 39-39-39 with the keyword MYVOTE + your message to the Premier saying why BC needs to stop killing bears for trophies (no extra costs, repeat as often as you like)

2. TWEET your above message to the Premier @CHRISTYCLARKBC using the hashtag #NOTROPHYHUNT (repeat at will)

3.  Visit and share the real-time animated word cloud of TEXT and TWITTER messages: 

      LIVE LINK TO REAL-TIME MESSAGES:  http://j.mp/NoTrophyHunt2014

 (PS.  If you are somewhat tech savvy, we can share a javascript embed code that you can copy and paste into your blog or website.)

Feb15RallyInfo'14

 

 

Silver Twins w Mother

   Christy Clark

Bear Witness: Film takes aim at Grizzly Hunt by Damien Gillis

Post from: http://commonsensecanadian.ca/VIDEO-detail/bear-witness-graphic-new-film-takes-aim-grizzly-hunt/

PostedSeptember 5, 2013 by Damien Gillis in BC
 
 
 

A new, 22-min documentary film released earlier this week by Coastal First Nations – a coalition of aboriginal bands which has led the campaign against the proposed Enbridge pipeline and tankers – aims to kill the grizzly trophy hunt on BC’s central coast.

“Bear Witness” tells the story of “Cheeky”, a grizzly well-liked by locals who was killed by hunters in the Great Bear Rainforest, his carcass abandoned to rot in Kwatna Estuary. The film also features a photo of BC-born NHL player Clayton Stoner posing with the paws and head of the dead bear.

Hockey star-hunter targeted

While the province had issued Stoner a legal permit, the coastal First Nations on whose territory the hunt occurred have banned the practice on their lands.

“I applied for and received a grizzly bear hunting licence through a British Columbia limited-entry lottery last winter and shot a grizzly bear with my licence while hunting with my father, uncle and a friend in May,” Stoner told media, in response to the controversy generated by the film.

I love to hunt and fish and will continue to do so with my family and friends in British Columbia.

The provocative film was designed to spearhead the First Nations’ campaign to pressure the government into respecting their trophy hunting ban. Its release has generated considerable media attention, putting Stoner and the controversial practice in the spotlight.

Chief Bob Chamberlin, Vice-President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs had strong words for trophy hunting after viewing the film. “It is atrocious to see such waste, and to see such a majestic creature just taken for its fur,” he told The Tyee. “I thought we as a society were moving past our barbaric ways, and were starting to look at things from an ecosystem approach to everything.”

Science unclear

The minister responsible for regulating the trophy hunt, Steve Thomson, showed little intention of complying with Coastal First Nations’ wishes when reached for comment this week:

As we did last fall, we would ask that [Coastal First Nations] respect the province’s authority over the harvest. It’s a harvest that is based on best available science…We believe we have a good management regime in place and we would ask that they respect that.

Provincial estimates peg grizzly populations at 15,000 – far below the 120,000-160,000 for black bears. Yet the methodology for arriving at these figures has been questioned.

A 2012 statement co-authored by four of BC’s top bear biologists – Wayne McCrory, Dr. Paul Paquet, Dr. Lance Craighead and Erica Mallam – declared:

We are now among the many scientists who say no grizzlies should be killed in BC by sport hunters because some BC grizzly populations are already at great risk of extinction. The ‘precautionary principle’ that all biologists should adhere to also dictates that the grizzly hunt should end.

The statement goes on to explain how experts retained by the government to assess the risks of the trophy hunt were later dismissed when their findings didn’t jive the the ministry’s wishes:

For four years, several of us were members of the former grizzly advisory panel, charged with the task of implementing the provincial government’s grizzly bear conservation strategy. Our hard work and recommendations were largely ignored. Not liking what we had to say, the provincial government disbanded our panel and formed a new one, perhaps in the hope of getting more “acceptable” recommendations.

The grizzly trophy hunt has been attacked for years, yet little has changed in terms of government policy. But with the media attention now surrounding this new film and campaign – not to mention the movement’s discovery of an inadvertent “poster child” in Stoner – it’s conceivable that the controversial hunt may be on its last legs. Especially considering the formidable campaign many of these same First Nations have led against Enbridge.

If they can stop Big Oil, the trophy hunt should be a cinch.