Tag Archives: endangered species

Times Colonist, Comment: Wildlife-Management Reform is Long Overdue

2015 09 05_0729

TIMES COLONIST AUGUST 11, 2017 http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/op-ed/comment-wildlife-management-reform-is-long-overdue-1.21795751

The underpinnings of contemporary wildlife management are political and ideological, largely at the expense of wildlife for the presumed benefit of people.

Unsurprisingly, wildlife management in British Columbia is marked by an outdated mindset that primarily views wild animals as a “resource” to be exploited by recreational hunting or as troublesome creatures that need to be killed because their existence conflicts with human endeavours. Saddled by a myopic adherence to the debunked and inaptly named North American model of wildlife conservation, wildlife policy in B.C. is mired in a philosophically and structurally faulty approach.

Simply, wildlife policies are focused on consumption and control, rather than conservation.

As ethicist Michael Nelson and wildlife ecologists John Vucetich, Paul C. Paquet and Joseph Bump note in their critique, North American Model: What’s Flawed, What’s Missing, What’s Needed, the model’s primary tenet, i.e. recreational hunting being central to wildlife conservation, is based upon an inadequate account of history and an inadequate ethic.

Largely ignoring the biology and intrinsic value of all species, the model reinforces the narrow idea that nature is a commodity — a “resource” — owned and used by humans in pursuit of personal interests. This “management” perspective draws its support from — and sustains — the view that humans exist outside of nature, and that other species, apart from their utility for humans, are of little importance in the larger scheme of things. Human dominion and domination over nature are deemed to be the natural order.

Predominantly driven by a recreational hunting agenda, the North American model is informed largely by values, attitudes and atavistic beliefs entrenched in the self-serving fallacy that killing wild animals for sport and control is essential to wildlife conservation.

As explained in the critique, the model relies on a misinterpretation of history in which recreational hunting is disproportionately, and inaccurately, seen as the driver of North American wildlife conservation, while downplaying the contributions of monumental figures such as John Muir and Aldo Leopold, who pioneered broad-based approaches to conservation without focusing on hunting as its primary tool.

The province’s recent proposal to privatize wildlife management illustrates the pernicious effect of the North American model on the mindset of government bureaucrats and politicians. In the run-up to the election, the B.C. Liberals announced plans to implement an extra-governmental agency that would be controlled by recreational hunting groups.

This perverse scheme is the culmination of decades of undue influence by the recreational hunting lobby on the B.C. government; it was also inevitable under the model, where science and ethics are ignored in favour of self-perpetuating myth and anecdote.

With its philosophical roots in the model, the grizzly-bear hunt is an egregious and persistent example of how B.C. wildlife management fails to address ecological, economic and ethical considerations. Using the province’s kill data to determine if B.C.’s grizzly management meets its own objectives, Raincoast Conservation Foundation scientists have found that total kills commonly exceed limits determined by provincial policy. Financial analyses have shown that grizzlies are worth far more alive than dead, and poll after poll indicates a clear majority of British Columbians have judged the recreational hunting of these large carnivores an abhorrent activity.

Considering centuries of human privilege over the needs of the environment, what we need to manage is not wildlife but ourselves. Recognizing that many human activities have damaging effects on biodiversity and ecological communities, what should wildlife management in B.C. look like?

Briefly, Raincoast envisions a compassionate conservation policy based on management for wildlife, as opposed to management of wildlife — a policy that takes into account the health and well-being of individuals and populations. Furthermore, we envision substantially more consideration given to maintaining the integrity of ecological systems upon which species depend.

Although species might continue to exist and suffer long after natural ecological relationships have been altered or destroyed, such impoverished conditions are not sustainable and do not typify healthy environments. Finally, wildlife management needs to emerge from the shadows and adopt practices in keeping with modern science, as well as principles regarding the ethical treatment of animals.

Without a significant shift in how we relate to and interact with wildlife, future generations will look back with stunned dismay at how our society could be so divorced from reality and morality. The hopeful news in B.C. is that with a new government there is the opportunity for positive change and a much more ecologically and ethically informed approach to wildlife management.

Chris Genovali is executive director of Raincoast Conservation Foundation. Large-carnivore expert Paul C. Paquet is Raincoast’s senior scientist. https://www.raincoast.org
© Copyright Times Colonist

 

Inside Namibian taxidermy factory stuffs 6,000 animals a year for trophy hunters

Mold of Elephant headMold of an Elephant Head

Is this what’s in store for Cecil? Inside the Namibian taxidermy factory which stuffs more than 6,000 animals a year for trophy hunters.
-Elephants are €38,000 (£27,000) to stuff, giraffes €8,500 (£6,000), leopards €1,800 (£1,300), rhinos €14,000 (£10,000)
-Every week dozens of white foreigners, mainly wealthy Germans and Americans, hunt at private game reserves
-Taxidermy is legal in Namibia and, ‘if you have enough money, you can usually shoot what you want’ says one guide

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3178868/Inside-Namibian-taxidermy-factory-stuffs-6-000-animals-year-trophy-hunters.html#ixzz4pCmtE3Ev
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Bears Matter note Aug 8,2017:  I wonder how many ‘game’ animals are stuffed in British Columbia! Hunter’s who hunt for food to put in the freezer don’t spend the big bucks to have an animal stuffed! Trophy killing is all about the trophy, don’t let anyone try and rationalize it any other way!
One day taxidermy will be a lost ‘art’… animal models will be replicated by computers instead and using non animal materials. One day soon I hope!

B.C’s Stop the Grizzly Killing Facebook Campaign! Deadline May 9, 2017!

WhoareweinBC

Facebook Page: Stop the Grizzly Killing  - Please Like and Share!

After a long winter, bears emerge from dens to face Trophy Killers.    They have no chance. It’s time for this to end British Columbia! Not BEAUTIFUL BC, NOT SUPER NATURAL … SUPER DISGUSTING!

Full Campaign Details and Donation Page click on:       www.tiny.cc/SaveTheGrizzlies Please share with friends!

Note: ALL FUNDS go directly to our Canadian campaign. There is no need to pay the Generosity fee, edit fee to 0.00. Before May 9th every dime will be spent on Sponsored Ads!
Election Day, May 9th could be the tipping point for our grizzlies…and their protection and also start to protect their habitat!

Thanking you in advance Barb, Neil, Kyle and our whole team.

Campaign Authorized by Stop the Grizzly Killing Society, registered sponsor under Election Act stopthegrizzlykilling@gmail.com

Stopthetrophyhuntlogo

 

 

April 1’17 Rally to End the ‘Grizzly’ Hunt -Videos of Speakers

1. Val Murray, Justice for BC Grizzlies and Organizer of Rally www.justiceforbcgrizzlies.com

2. Trish Boyum, Ocean Adventures Chartered Tours

3. Bryce Casavant, NDP Candidate Oak Bay-Gordon Head

4. Jens Wieting, Sierra Club of B.C.

5. Donna Johnson, Wuikinuxv Nation

6. Sonia Furstenau – Green Candidate

7. Jordan Reichert, Animal Protection Party of Canada

Published on Apr 4, 2017
Justice for BC Grizzlies organized the April 1st Rally for B.C. Grizzlies, bringing citizens together to pressure the government to end the Trophy Hunt of Grizzly Bears in BC. Justice for BC Grizzlies is a diverse grassroots movement of BC residents. We share a common concern over the brutal killing of Grizzly Bears in a lottery hunt that takes place twice each year. Together we are making the grizzly hunt an election issue in BC. #grizzlies #grizzly #endthehunt #trophyhunt

Stopthetrophyhuntlogo

 

 

 

Bear Viewing Today and Always posted by Justice for BC Grizzlies

 

2015 09 05_0715

“ I’m afraid to even breathe.”

This, uttered in the smallest of whispers by a substantially large, typically exuberant Australian fellow sitting next to me in our open skiff, as we quietly bobbed offshore from where a young female Grizzly Bear dined on her stick full of breakfast mussels.

It’s what happens when I view grizzlies on their home range. It makes me want to hold my breath, to keep the spell going; it’s downright intoxicating.

Many people have never seen a grizzly close enough to actually observe their behavior, hear them chew and huff, see them scent the wind and gain a sense of the individuality of these creatures. They look so different from one another in colour, markings, body language and general carriage. They are intensely focused on food, which stands to reason when you consider how much grass, grubs, mice, bark, mushrooms, bulbs, insects, fruit, seeds, carrion and fish (sometimes) it takes to fill a bear’s belly. With plenty of food and no threats, they just go about their business.

Likely, most politicians have never observed a bear in such a way. In fact, the image of grizzlies that they hold may be rooted in misconceptions of fear and misunderstanding. Yet these same politicians are making policy decisions about the fate of grizzlies.

Re-framing mindsets about Grizzly Bears is a service to humanity. Consider this: that magical moment of wanting to whisper in the presence of a grizzly touches part of our brain that soothes the “fight or flight” response and bathes the nervous system with compassion and understanding. We make better decisions in such a state; that’s good for us and good for the grizzlies.

Caring about Grizzly Bears is a window into caring for all of Nature, of which we all are part.

by Valerie Murray for https://JusticeforBCGrizzlies June 21, 2016

Martyn Brown: The Grisly (Grizzly) Business of Trophy Hunting in Super, Natural British Columbia

To Comment and to view photos go to: http://www.straight.com/news/724881/martyn-brown-grisly-business-trophy-hunting-super-natural-british-columbia

Martyn Brown: The grisly business of trophy hunting in Super, Natural British Columbia
une 24th, 2016 at 3:40 PM
Martyn Brown is was the long-serving chief of staff to former premier Gordon Campbell.

Imagery abounds. Golden fields of swaying wheat. Lush green vineyards of plump, perfect grapes. Acres of apples, all red and delicious. Harvest: so suggestive of humans in harmony with the Earth.

So redolent of life.

So much more super and natural than, I don’t know—slaughter?—the word that more accurately describes British Columbia’s annual grizzly bear trophy hunt.

Actually, even that word isn’t quite accurate, for it connotes the killing of animals for food.

Grizzly bears—like black bears, cougars, wolves, lynxes, bobcats, and wolverines–are legally “harvested” without any expectation that their meat will be eaten by people.

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