Tag Archives: Great Bear Rainforest

Stop the Grizzly Killing Facebook BC- Grizzly Hunt starts Aug.15,2017

STGK PostAug15'17                                                              BC to ban the “Trophy Grizzly Bear Really?
No, Grizzly killing season starts today, August 15, 2017                                                Today the government sanctioned grizzly hunt resumes. Bears will still be killed for bragging rights and trophy photos. This abhorrent behavior will soon be justified by re-branding Grizzlies as food, a ridiculous loophole. Shame on you British Columbia. This is just lipstick on a pig.

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B.C.’s Trophy Hunt Ban a Good Step but Loophole Puts Bears at Risk

August 15, 2017
VANCOUVER — B.C.’s cancellation of the grizzly bear trophy hunt is a good step but a loophole that allows hunting the bears for meat is cause for concern, according to the David Suzuki Foundation. The province-wide ban goes into effect on November 30, following this year’s hunting season. It will not prohibit hunters from killing grizzly bears for meat outside of the Great Bear Rainforest.

“We really hoped provisions to ban the hunt in the Great Bear Rainforest would apply to the whole province,” said David Suzuki Foundation Ontario and Northern Canada director Faisal Moola. “The government’s decision means hundreds of grizzly bears will be spared, and that is welcome news. Their pelts, paws, heads and other body parts will no longer be displayed by foreign or local hunters as trophies.”
Bear experts have long known that keeping grizzly populations healthy means protecting their habitat and ensuring humans do not needlessly kill them.

“Although this decision will help reduce the numbers of grizzly bears killed by humans, the provision allowing them to be killed for meat means bears will still be killed,” Moola said. “Grizzly bears are a federally ranked species at risk and it is unclear how a grizzly bear food hunt could be regulated and enforced to ensure hunters do not needlessly shoot bears.”

The David Suzuki Foundation has campaigned for an end to killing of grizzly bears for close to 15 years. It has published numerous scientific studies on the controversial practice, mobilized thousands of B.C. residents in opposition to the trophy hunt and last year successfully convinced B.C.’s auditor general to open an investigation into trophy hunt management and other grizzly bear policies.

A century ago, 35,000 grizzly bears lived in British Columbia and flourished from Alaska to Mexico and east across the Prairies. Today, only about 15,000 grizzly bears inhabit B.C. and have been eliminated from the Lower Mainland, the Okanagan and around Fort St. John.

Grizzlies are highly sensitive to human impacts such as loss and fragmentation of their forest and mountain habitats by clearcuts, roads, oil and gas pipelines and other industrial infrastructure. Female bears reproduce later in life and often produce only a small number of cubs that survive into adulthood. Grizzlies travel long distances to find food, putting them at risk of coming into contact with hunters, roads, towns and other human encroachments into their habitat.
Unlike B.C.’s plan, the Alberta government has maintained a moratorium on all grizzly bear hunting since 2006. Grizzly bear hunting is also banned in the continental United States. B.C. grizzly populations remain healthy in many parts of the province, but independent analyses have found widespread overkilling of bears in some areas and at rates that exceed government limits.
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Media contacts:
Faisal Moola, Director of Ontario and Northern Canada

http://www.davidsuzuki.org/media/news/2017/08/bcs-trophy-hunt-ban-a-good-step-but-loophole-puts-bears-at-risk/?utm_campaign=grizzlyTrophyHunt-mediaRelease-en-15aug2017&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=page-link

Times Colonist, Comment: Wildlife-Management Reform is Long Overdue

2015 09 05_0729

TIMES COLONIST AUGUST 11, 2017 http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/op-ed/comment-wildlife-management-reform-is-long-overdue-1.21795751

The underpinnings of contemporary wildlife management are political and ideological, largely at the expense of wildlife for the presumed benefit of people.

Unsurprisingly, wildlife management in British Columbia is marked by an outdated mindset that primarily views wild animals as a “resource” to be exploited by recreational hunting or as troublesome creatures that need to be killed because their existence conflicts with human endeavours. Saddled by a myopic adherence to the debunked and inaptly named North American model of wildlife conservation, wildlife policy in B.C. is mired in a philosophically and structurally faulty approach.

Simply, wildlife policies are focused on consumption and control, rather than conservation.

As ethicist Michael Nelson and wildlife ecologists John Vucetich, Paul C. Paquet and Joseph Bump note in their critique, North American Model: What’s Flawed, What’s Missing, What’s Needed, the model’s primary tenet, i.e. recreational hunting being central to wildlife conservation, is based upon an inadequate account of history and an inadequate ethic.

Largely ignoring the biology and intrinsic value of all species, the model reinforces the narrow idea that nature is a commodity — a “resource” — owned and used by humans in pursuit of personal interests. This “management” perspective draws its support from — and sustains — the view that humans exist outside of nature, and that other species, apart from their utility for humans, are of little importance in the larger scheme of things. Human dominion and domination over nature are deemed to be the natural order.

Predominantly driven by a recreational hunting agenda, the North American model is informed largely by values, attitudes and atavistic beliefs entrenched in the self-serving fallacy that killing wild animals for sport and control is essential to wildlife conservation.

As explained in the critique, the model relies on a misinterpretation of history in which recreational hunting is disproportionately, and inaccurately, seen as the driver of North American wildlife conservation, while downplaying the contributions of monumental figures such as John Muir and Aldo Leopold, who pioneered broad-based approaches to conservation without focusing on hunting as its primary tool.

The province’s recent proposal to privatize wildlife management illustrates the pernicious effect of the North American model on the mindset of government bureaucrats and politicians. In the run-up to the election, the B.C. Liberals announced plans to implement an extra-governmental agency that would be controlled by recreational hunting groups.

This perverse scheme is the culmination of decades of undue influence by the recreational hunting lobby on the B.C. government; it was also inevitable under the model, where science and ethics are ignored in favour of self-perpetuating myth and anecdote.

With its philosophical roots in the model, the grizzly-bear hunt is an egregious and persistent example of how B.C. wildlife management fails to address ecological, economic and ethical considerations. Using the province’s kill data to determine if B.C.’s grizzly management meets its own objectives, Raincoast Conservation Foundation scientists have found that total kills commonly exceed limits determined by provincial policy. Financial analyses have shown that grizzlies are worth far more alive than dead, and poll after poll indicates a clear majority of British Columbians have judged the recreational hunting of these large carnivores an abhorrent activity.

Considering centuries of human privilege over the needs of the environment, what we need to manage is not wildlife but ourselves. Recognizing that many human activities have damaging effects on biodiversity and ecological communities, what should wildlife management in B.C. look like?

Briefly, Raincoast envisions a compassionate conservation policy based on management for wildlife, as opposed to management of wildlife — a policy that takes into account the health and well-being of individuals and populations. Furthermore, we envision substantially more consideration given to maintaining the integrity of ecological systems upon which species depend.

Although species might continue to exist and suffer long after natural ecological relationships have been altered or destroyed, such impoverished conditions are not sustainable and do not typify healthy environments. Finally, wildlife management needs to emerge from the shadows and adopt practices in keeping with modern science, as well as principles regarding the ethical treatment of animals.

Without a significant shift in how we relate to and interact with wildlife, future generations will look back with stunned dismay at how our society could be so divorced from reality and morality. The hopeful news in B.C. is that with a new government there is the opportunity for positive change and a much more ecologically and ethically informed approach to wildlife management.

Chris Genovali is executive director of Raincoast Conservation Foundation. Large-carnivore expert Paul C. Paquet is Raincoast’s senior scientist. https://www.raincoast.org
© Copyright Times Colonist

 

CBC: Future of B.C.’s grizzly trophy hunt uncertain as fall hunt approaches

grizzly-bear-near-bella-coolaA grizzly bear is seen fishing for salmon along the Atnarko river in Tweedsmuir Provincial Park near Bella Coola, B.C. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)http://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4220550
NDP promised to end the controversial hunt, but few details on how and when the ban would be implemented  Roshini Nair – CBC News July 25, 2017

The NDP promised to end B.C.’s grizzly bear trophy hunt, but with the September hunt rapidly approaching there are few details to explain how or when that would happen.

B.C.’s grizzly bear trophy hunt allows both resident and non-resident hunters to purchase a licence to hunt a grizzly bear for sport according to a predetermined quota.

License cost varies according to whether the hunter is a B.C. resident ($80) or not ($1000). Non-residents are also required to employ a registered guide outfitter. The trophy hunt takes place in the spring and fall.

Last November, Premier John Horgan made a campaign promise he would end the controversial hunt, promising full protection for the “majestic animals.  “But with the hunt scheduled in September, the deadline to pass a ban is imminent.

Political flashpoint

The former Liberal government maintained the hunt has a positive economic impact — supporting local outfitters and tourist operations — and that the grizzly population is healthy enough to absorb the hunt.

Mark Werner, the vice-president of the Guide Outfitters Association of B.C., said the hunt is an important part of the province’s heritage. “This country and this province [were] built on trapping, hunting and fishing,” he said. “We have a lot of heritage here. We have a lot of culture here.”

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B.C’s Stop the Grizzly Killing Facebook Campaign! Deadline May 9, 2017!

WhoareweinBC

Facebook Page: Stop the Grizzly Killing  - Please Like and Share!

After a long winter, bears emerge from dens to face Trophy Killers.    They have no chance. It’s time for this to end British Columbia! Not BEAUTIFUL BC, NOT SUPER NATURAL … SUPER DISGUSTING!

Full Campaign Details and Donation Page click on:       www.tiny.cc/SaveTheGrizzlies Please share with friends!

Note: ALL FUNDS go directly to our Canadian campaign. There is no need to pay the Generosity fee, edit fee to 0.00. Before May 9th every dime will be spent on Sponsored Ads!
Election Day, May 9th could be the tipping point for our grizzlies…and their protection and also start to protect their habitat!

Thanking you in advance Barb, Neil, Kyle and our whole team.

Campaign Authorized by Stop the Grizzly Killing Society, registered sponsor under Election Act stopthegrizzlykilling@gmail.com

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Horgan and NDP Commits to Ban Grizzly Bear Trophy Hunt- November 24, 2016

November 24, 2016

http://bcndpcaucus.ca/news/horgan-commits-ban-grizzly-bear-trophy-hunt/#.WDiwzNATQ4Y.twitter

ndppressconfnov23rdVANCOUVER– New Democrat leader John Horgan announced a New Democrat government will ban the trophy hunting of grizzly bears in British Columbia.

“It’s time for some leadership here,” said Horgan. “We can look after our natural environment, respect the outdoor traditions of this province and grow the economy if we make the right choices. That should start now with a change in how we treat the iconic grizzly bears of B.C.”

Horgan added, “This province has a proud outdoor heritage that includes hunting and fishing. We also have a future that includes welcoming the world to enjoy our spectacular scenery and wildlife, creating jobs for British Columbians and a tourism industry that is second to none. Our heritage and our future can thrive together if we make the right choices.”

“The Coastal First Nations banned the grizzly trophy hunt in the Great Bear Rainforest four years ago. A provincial ban is long overdue to stop the needless killing of grizzly bears for sport. Grizzly bears are respected by many First Nations across the province. Bear claws, hides and teeth are not trophies,” said Doug Neasloss, Chief Councillor for the Kitasoo/Xai’Xais.

“The wildlife viewing industry is booming in this province, and creating good jobs from Vancouver to Stewart,” said Spencer Chandra Herbert, the B.C. New Democrat spokesperson for tourism, “Grizzlies are an iconic species and B.C.’s grizzlies can continue to attract visitors from all over the world if we make the right choices.”

Horgan added that his party had introduced legislation to ensure wildlife and habitat management has secure funding in the province – a bill supported by hunters and wildlife viewing companies, but rejected by the government.

“Wildlife, wildlife habitat, and the families, communities and economies that depend on them can’t wait any longer,” said Horgan, “Christy Clark won’t act, but I will.”

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