Tag Archives: grizzly hunt

BC Bungled Grizzly Bear Management: Auditor General Report by Judith Lavoie

Oct24'17Desmog

https://www.desmog.ca/2017/10/24/b-c-bungled-grizzly-bear-management-auditor-general

A muddled mess of plans that were never implemented, unclear accountability, lack of organized monitoring and spotty oversight has been at the root of the provincial government’s management of grizzly bear populations for more than two decades, Auditor General Carol Bellringer found in a highly critical report released Tuesday.
The report confirms many of the concerns frequently raised by conservation groups.  A lack of firm population numbers. Resource extraction in grizzly bear habitat. Lax regulation of the grizzly bear trophy hunt.
“This is a scathing indictment of the poor management of grizzly bears by successive B.C. governments, going back decades,” said Faisal Moola, director of the David Suzuki Foundation, which requested an audit in 2014 along with University of Victoria’s Environmental Law Centre.
To understand where things went wrong, we’ve got to rewind to 1995 when the government committed to a “Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy” with a goal to maintain healthy grizzly bear populations and the ecosystems they depend on.
But the Environment Ministry and Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources never clarified responsibilities and priorities in terms of actually implementing the strategy.
“Currently, there is no organized inventory and limited monitoring of grizzly bears. We found that one of the reasons this work is not being carried out is that there is no dedicated ministry funding,” says the report.

In other cases, government created plans, such as the strategy for recovering the endangered North Cascades grizzly population, but plans were never implemented.
“In many cases they have not developed policies and procedures necessary to ensure the survival of grizzly bear populations and, when they have had plans, they have failed to effectively implement them,” Moola said.
Government figures estimate there are now 15,000 grizzly bears in B.C. — one of the last areas in North America where grizzly bears live in their natural habitat. But that figure is questioned by some scientists — and nine of the province’s grizzly bear populations are on the verge of elimination.
A century ago, 35,000 grizzly bears lived in B.C, while other populations flourished from Alaska to Mexico to Manitoba, according to the Suzuki Foundation.
Some populations of bears have increased, Bellringer noted, but that is not the result of management strategies.
Habitat Destruction Key Threat to Grizzly Bears
Despite the public controversy that has raged around the grizzly bear trophy hunt, with 250 to 300 bears killed every year, the greatest threat is not hunting, but human activities that degrade grizzly bear habitat, Bellringer wrote.
“For example, there are 600,000 kilometres of resource roads with, on the order of 10,000 kilometres more added each year. This expansion allows greater human access into wilderness areas, which results in illegal killing of grizzly bears and greater human-bear conflicts,” she wrote.
Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Doug Donaldson and Environment Minister George Heyman said the government is accepting all 10 recommendations in the report and will develop a grizzly bear management plan with clear objectives, roles, responsibilities and accountabilities.
The recommendations include improvements in monitoring populations and threats, developing an adequately funded inventory of bears, increased transparency, ensuring the Conservation Officer Service has enough resources to respond to grizzly/human conflicts, developing clear policies and procedures for bear viewing, mitigating the effect of industry on bear habitat, adjusting tools needed to conserve habitat and reviewing wildlife management in B.C.
Some Areas Need to be ‘Off Limits’ To Industry to Protect Habitat

Read More at https://www.desmog.ca/2017/10/24/b-c-bungled-grizzly-bear-management-auditor-general

 

 

Pacific Wild Blog: Poll British Columbians Support Ban on All Grizzly Bear Hunting

Click Here to Read Full Blog on Pacific Wild’s Site

IanMcAllisterGrizzlyCub  Oct 3, 2017Pacific Wild
Vancouver, BC – Three-in-four British Columbians believe no grizzly bears should be hunted in the province, a new poll by Insights West conducted in partnership with Lush Cosmetics and the Commercial Bear Viewing Association has found.
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 74% of British Columbians are in favour of banning all grizzly bear hunting in the province, while 19% are opposed.
The highest level of support for banning all hunting of grizzly bears in British Columbia is observed among women (78%), residents aged 35-to-54 (79%), Vancouver Islanders (81%), BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and BC Green Party voters in the 2017 provincial election (81% for each) and non-hunters (75%).
In addition, almost three-in-five self-described hunters (58%) are in favour of banning all grizzly bear hunting in British Columbia.

PollBanMeatHuntOct'17

The Government of British Columbia recently banned trophy hunting of grizzly bears in the province. This decision is backed by almost nine-in-ten British Columbians (88%), including 69% who “strongly” support it.
The survey was conducted at the end of August, two weeks after the government’s announcement. The decision allows a residential hunt to continue.
“Our polling has shown that British Columbians have consistently been opposed to trophy hunting, so the level of support for the government’s decision is not surprising,” says Mario Canseco, Vice President, Public Affairs, at Insights West. “Still, with so many residents who believe grizzlies should not be hunted at all, there is definitely appetite for more action.”
“With such strong results from British Columbians, we believe that the government can go further and ban all hunting of grizzly bears across the province,” says Tricia Stevens, Charitable Giving Manager at Lush Cosmetics. “Scientists, bear viewing operators, conservationists and now even hunters are agreeing it’s time to protect this iconic species for once and for all.”

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Bears Matter: Pacific Wild Press Release,Government to Consult on Grizzly Bear Ban

Go to Pacific Wild’s FULL Press Release fr Oct 3, 2017 directly by clicking HERE

IanMcAllisterGrizzlies

British Columbians are being given the opportunity to provide input on new proposed grizzly bear regulations.
On Aug. 14, 2017, the B.C. government announced that effective Nov. 30, 2017 it will end trophy hunting of grizzly bears and stop all hunting of grizzly bears in the Great Bear Rainforest. The decision allows a residential hunt to continue.
Until Nov. 2, the public can provide input into two policy documents outlining the proposed regulation changes required to implement the ban.
As part of the consultation, input is being sought on:
Changes to manage the ban in hunting areas that overlap the Great Bear Rainforest;
Changes that will prohibit the possession of “trophy” grizzly bear parts;
Changes that will manage prohibited grizzly bear parts;
Changes to prohibit the trafficking of grizzly bear parts, and
New reporting requirements for taxidermists.
The two policy documents can be reviewed at: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw
Members of the public may send comments to the Fish and Wildlife Branch at: grizzly.bear@gov.bc.ca  or for Template by clicking HERE

 

Bears Matter Invites YOU to SeaLegacy’s Campaign to Stop Grizzly Killing in B.C.!

The half-hearted grizzly hunting moratorium in B.C. is not enough. We need to end hunting of all grizzly bears, forever

NicklenGrizzlies

At SeaLegacy, we are not going to be sidetracked by the B.C. government’s half-hearted decision to put a 2018 moratorium on the grizzly bear hunt, and we will continue to rally support until the government takes the killing of these majestic bears seriously.
In a months’s time, from the close of 2017’s hunting season on November 30th, the government of British Columbia is claiming to have banned all hunting of grizzlies within the Great Bear Rainforest of the mid central coast. While we recognise this step in the right direction, they have left a gaping and unnecessary loophole that is bound to be exploited: grizzly bears can still be hunted for meat.

This move is a glaring attempt to stay true to their campaign promise while still allowing trophy hunters to kill apex predators in B.C.’s territory. The government claims there are approximately 15,000 grizzlies in B.C. and hunters kill about 250 every year.
Natural Resources Minister Doug Donaldson has stated, “Hunters will no longer be able to possess the hide or the head or the paws of the bear, so we feel quite confident that this announcement will mean the end of the grizzly bear trophy hunt through the province.”
At SeaLegacy we know these immense, solitary creatures are more fragile than most people believe, requiring 4,000 square kilometres each as territory.
They are an umbrella species whose health can help determine the health of an entire ecosystem. To hunt them is anything but noble, and we want to add our voice to the loud chorus of British Columbians and citizens of the world who understand their value beyond a hide on a wall or a meal on a plate. After a recent week of filming brown bears in Alaska, SeaLegacy co-founder Paul Nicklen recalled his time working with these great brown bears.

Read More, See Stunning Photos and Take Action by going to https://act.sealegacy.org/s/stop-the-trophy-hunt

Stop the Grizzly Killing Facebook BC- Grizzly Hunt starts Aug.15,2017

STGK PostAug15'17                                                              BC to ban the “Trophy Grizzly Bear Really?
No, Grizzly killing season starts today, August 15, 2017                                                Today the government sanctioned grizzly hunt resumes. Bears will still be killed for bragging rights and trophy photos. This abhorrent behavior will soon be justified by re-branding Grizzlies as food, a ridiculous loophole. Shame on you British Columbia. This is just lipstick on a pig.

Please Like and Share this page: https://www.facebook.com/StoptheGrizzlyKilling

B.C.’s Trophy Hunt Ban a Good Step but Loophole Puts Bears at Risk

August 15, 2017
VANCOUVER — B.C.’s cancellation of the grizzly bear trophy hunt is a good step but a loophole that allows hunting the bears for meat is cause for concern, according to the David Suzuki Foundation. The province-wide ban goes into effect on November 30, following this year’s hunting season. It will not prohibit hunters from killing grizzly bears for meat outside of the Great Bear Rainforest.

“We really hoped provisions to ban the hunt in the Great Bear Rainforest would apply to the whole province,” said David Suzuki Foundation Ontario and Northern Canada director Faisal Moola. “The government’s decision means hundreds of grizzly bears will be spared, and that is welcome news. Their pelts, paws, heads and other body parts will no longer be displayed by foreign or local hunters as trophies.”
Bear experts have long known that keeping grizzly populations healthy means protecting their habitat and ensuring humans do not needlessly kill them.

“Although this decision will help reduce the numbers of grizzly bears killed by humans, the provision allowing them to be killed for meat means bears will still be killed,” Moola said. “Grizzly bears are a federally ranked species at risk and it is unclear how a grizzly bear food hunt could be regulated and enforced to ensure hunters do not needlessly shoot bears.”

The David Suzuki Foundation has campaigned for an end to killing of grizzly bears for close to 15 years. It has published numerous scientific studies on the controversial practice, mobilized thousands of B.C. residents in opposition to the trophy hunt and last year successfully convinced B.C.’s auditor general to open an investigation into trophy hunt management and other grizzly bear policies.

A century ago, 35,000 grizzly bears lived in British Columbia and flourished from Alaska to Mexico and east across the Prairies. Today, only about 15,000 grizzly bears inhabit B.C. and have been eliminated from the Lower Mainland, the Okanagan and around Fort St. John.

Grizzlies are highly sensitive to human impacts such as loss and fragmentation of their forest and mountain habitats by clearcuts, roads, oil and gas pipelines and other industrial infrastructure. Female bears reproduce later in life and often produce only a small number of cubs that survive into adulthood. Grizzlies travel long distances to find food, putting them at risk of coming into contact with hunters, roads, towns and other human encroachments into their habitat.
Unlike B.C.’s plan, the Alberta government has maintained a moratorium on all grizzly bear hunting since 2006. Grizzly bear hunting is also banned in the continental United States. B.C. grizzly populations remain healthy in many parts of the province, but independent analyses have found widespread overkilling of bears in some areas and at rates that exceed government limits.
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Media contacts:
Faisal Moola, Director of Ontario and Northern Canada

http://www.davidsuzuki.org/media/news/2017/08/bcs-trophy-hunt-ban-a-good-step-but-loophole-puts-bears-at-risk/?utm_campaign=grizzlyTrophyHunt-mediaRelease-en-15aug2017&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=page-link