Tag Archives: grizzly hunt

Horgan and NDP Commits to Ban Grizzly Bear Trophy Hunt- November 24, 2016

November 24, 2016

http://bcndpcaucus.ca/news/horgan-commits-ban-grizzly-bear-trophy-hunt/#.WDiwzNATQ4Y.twitter

ndppressconfnov23rdVANCOUVER– New Democrat leader John Horgan announced a New Democrat government will ban the trophy hunting of grizzly bears in British Columbia.

“It’s time for some leadership here,” said Horgan. “We can look after our natural environment, respect the outdoor traditions of this province and grow the economy if we make the right choices. That should start now with a change in how we treat the iconic grizzly bears of B.C.”

Horgan added, “This province has a proud outdoor heritage that includes hunting and fishing. We also have a future that includes welcoming the world to enjoy our spectacular scenery and wildlife, creating jobs for British Columbians and a tourism industry that is second to none. Our heritage and our future can thrive together if we make the right choices.”

“The Coastal First Nations banned the grizzly trophy hunt in the Great Bear Rainforest four years ago. A provincial ban is long overdue to stop the needless killing of grizzly bears for sport. Grizzly bears are respected by many First Nations across the province. Bear claws, hides and teeth are not trophies,” said Doug Neasloss, Chief Councillor for the Kitasoo/Xai’Xais.

“The wildlife viewing industry is booming in this province, and creating good jobs from Vancouver to Stewart,” said Spencer Chandra Herbert, the B.C. New Democrat spokesperson for tourism, “Grizzlies are an iconic species and B.C.’s grizzlies can continue to attract visitors from all over the world if we make the right choices.”

Horgan added that his party had introduced legislation to ensure wildlife and habitat management has secure funding in the province – a bill supported by hunters and wildlife viewing companies, but rejected by the government.

“Wildlife, wildlife habitat, and the families, communities and economies that depend on them can’t wait any longer,” said Horgan, “Christy Clark won’t act, but I will.”

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Globe and Mail Opinion: After the Spear Outrage We Must Fight to Protect Canada’s Iconic Bears

Getty Images/istock

Getty Images/istock

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/after-the-spear-outrage-we-must-fight-to-protect-canadas-iconic-bears/article31447415/   August 17, 2016

Julius Strauss is a B.C.-based bear viewing guide and member of the Commercial Bear Viewing Association

The killing of a black bear by a U.S. hunter with a spear this week in Alberta has caused public outrage.

What has shocked is not so much the cruelty involved – the bear survived its initial injuries and ran off into the forest only to die later – but that the bear had been baited, and the act was legal.

The hunter, Josh Bowmar from Ohio, went on to celebrate the feat by posting a video of the killing on YouTube replete with footage from a GoPro he had attached to the spear.

Another hunter said Mr. Bowmar had “cojones” for being willing to approach the bear on foot, as it rummaged around a baited barrel that had been put out specifically for the purpose.

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BC Almanac Podcast with Justice for BC Grizzlies and Others on August 17, 2016

Copy of val - Copy                JusticeforBCGrizzliesLogo

Val Murray  of Justice for BC Grizzlies      Logo for Justice for BC Grizzlies

Listen to podcast at 17:20mark to hear arguments from all sides re: grizzly hunt in BC  – Introducing the new concerned citizen’s group Justice for BC Grizzlies

podcast.cbc.cahttp://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/bcalmanac_20160817_31168.mp3

Go to: www.justiceforbcgrizzlies.com. Facebook: @justiceforbcgrizzlies  Twitter @justice4bcgrizz email: justiceforbcgrizzlies@telus.net

 

 

 

Charlie Russell: Discoverying the True Nature of the Grizzly Bear, YouTube Video March’16

 

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Hello B.C. Bear Friends,Copy of Russell40

A gift to ALL! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLpyFH1Y-aA&feature=youtu.be

A 46 minute long video and so well worth the view. We must really LISTEN carefully to Charlie Russell’s words and step up ourselves to tell the true story about grizzlies.

We must NOW take Charlie Russell’s life’s message to our politicians, candidates and voters with as much conviction, commitment and passion as he has shown all these years. Now in his mid-seventies, Charlie is still fighting for the grizzlies and we must fight along side him. We have to finally bring peace to our grizzlies in British Columbia and end the killing.

Once we end the killing of grizzlies in our backyard we can help grizzlies in other jurisdictions.
Enjoy and Share,

Justice for BC Grizzlies – Citizen’s Campaign’17 www.justiceforbcgrizzlies.com justiceforbcgrizzlies@telus.net
facebook: @justiceforbcgrizzlies
twitter: @justice4bcgrizz

Note: YouTube Video: Published on Mar 29, 2016 by Wilderness Wildlife and Human Interaction Cochrane Research Institute, Discovering the true nature of the Grizzly Bear

The Lens of Choice by Justice for BC Grizzlies

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Posted by justiceforbcgrizzlies on July 13, 2016

Trophy bear hunting is hard to talk about. It evokes really powerful emotions and quite frankly I would avoid it if I could. But I made a promise to the bears that I will take a stand on their behalf. So this is where I stand: Killing bears for the sole purpose of taking body parts to display as “trophy” is a social justice issue that is just plain wrong. It needs to end everywhere in BC and by anyone in BC.

The Liberal government spends a lot of money trying to count bears in each of the province’s 56 Grizzly Bear Population Units (GBPU). It spends a further amount managing the annual hunts. It’s easy to think that numbers, statistics and modeling projections tell the truth; they look so clean and reliable. What isn’t so apparent are the value assumptions that lay beneath the numbers and what those views are saying to citizens of this province.

Bear viewing and bear killing obviously cannot happen in the same locations at the same time. Even more so, they are antithetical because they are grounded in differing views about the way the world is. Generally speaking, people who go bear viewing are in small cooperative groups whose values are grounded in curiosity, wonder, trust, peace and human-animal coexistence. Bear trophy hunting acts on a different set of values. People who kill bears for sport make different assumptions from a worldview of certainty, defense, contest, dominance and human-animal conflict. It’s up to ordinary citizens to decide which way of viewing the world most speaks to how they see themselves and their communities.

Population estimates of grizzlies reveal nothing about bear personalities, which anyone who knows bears is intriqued to study. Like which bears have learned to skillfully fish off the lip of a fast-moving waterfall, or swim underwater, or steal fish from other bears. Numbers say nothing about which bear lost an ear over the winter or which mothers have learned, from painful experience, to raise their cubs to maturity. Government officials and guide outfitters will say that such details have no place in serious, “scientific” discussions about bears. In my view, these very details have an essential place because each bear is a unique individual, in much the same way as each human is a unique individual.

Nobody knows for certain how many grizzlies there are in BC. They can’t be counted. Grizzlies have the slowest reproduction rate of any mammal in North America and mortality rates are thought to be much higher than reported. A female grizzly might replace herself only once in her lifetime. Nobody knows how quickly a bear population is replacing itself year to year, or how low a population can go before its members experience rapid, irreversible decline. Sub-adult cubs remain close to their mother’s range before moving farther afield, so dispersal of bear populations is slow. Male grizzlies need a home range of up to 1700 km2 (~650 sq. miles) of connected habitats in order to forage and find females of breeding readiness. They work hard just to live. Killing the largest bears damages genetic information in the species. Roads being built for human recreation, industry and habitation are constantly fragmenting grizzly home ranges. And once a population is recognized as threatened, recovery efforts move at a glacial pace.

Population estimates don’t tell any authentic stories of Grizzly Bears and no number of bears is high enough to justify killing them for sport. Justice for BC grizzlies means to stop killing them and to support education for understanding bears and living around them safely.

Taken from: https://justiceforbcgrizzlies.com/2016/07/13/bear-viewing-by-boat/

 

Natural Liberty; Grizzlies Deserve the Right to Live…..Blog by Justice for BC Grizzlies

Someone commented to me recently, “Bears haven’t changed one bit. It’s people that have changed. Bears are still doing what bears have done for thousands of years”. It’s so true.

Wild animals are essentially ownerless in their natural settings. But from early days when nobility and settler groups assumed land title, they also laid claim to all that lived upon those lands. This essentially continues today in the form of provincial authority over Crown lands, which lumps wildlife in with oil, gas, trees, minerals; every form of “resource” extraction.

Consider these observations:

The majority of BC residents are opposed to trophy hunting of Grizzly Bears. Yet other than a short, four-month moratorium on grizzly hunting by the NDP government in 2001, trophy hunting has continued in BC. The government is assumed to hold Crown* land “in public trust” for present and future generations but clearly does not have social license to kill grizzlies. It may even be considered a violation of public trust.

* It must be noted that ~ 95% of the land base in BC is unceded territories of First Nations who take issue with the concept of Crown lands.

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Animal law is a field of legal practice that is still young and growing. Few lawyers represent the interests of animals but those who do, do so because they believe that sentient beings deserve their natural liberty and are not property or “chattel”.

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The now famous CREST (The Center for Responsible Travel) report of 2014 assessed bear viewing in the Great Bear Rainforest at 12 times more profitable than bear (trophy) hunting. Grizzlies more than “earn their keep” in the province.

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All of which lines up on the side of leaving grizzlies in peace to do what they have done for thousands of years.

It’s no stretch to call it an evolutionary impulse, this desire to see animals live in peace. And now is the time. A different attitude exists today than in 1888, for instance, when a black bear cub on Stanley Park grounds was chained to a stump and became the first inhabitant of the zoo. That was acceptable then, as was the donation of four Arctic polar bears to the zoo by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1962. That simply could not be done in BC today without an activist movement opposing it. And that’s how it should be.

In 2016, it’s justice for Grizzly Bears to have their natural liberty; to eat, play, rest and lumber freely on their home ranges.

Taken from https://justiceforbcgrizzlies.com July 7, 2016